A History of the Bible: A belter of a book

Review: John Barton’s compelling new work looks at the good book as a text of cultural and religious significance

Barton looks at tranlsations of the bible, and how they have been ‘a vehicle for and a product of prevailing theological, philosophical, cultural and political trends, ideologies and (occasionally) insanities’

Barton looks at tranlsations of the bible, and how they have been ‘a vehicle for and a product of prevailing theological, philosophical, cultural and political trends, ideologies and (occasionally) insanities’

“Attention Christians! Are you tired of hearing your pastor correct the preserved word of God (the authorised King James Version) with the Greek or other translations? Are you interested in attending a Bible-believing Baptist church in the Charlotte area? If so, call 394-8051.”

This notice, seen outside a church in Charlotte, North Carolina, seems to suggest that the Greek New Testament is a translation of the King James Version when the Greek text pre-dates it by 1,500 years.

Indeed this church, called the Bible Believers’ Church, maintains that the King James Version “is the perfect word of God … and preserves the very words of God in the form in which he wished them to be represented in the universal language of these last days: English.”

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