A modern fable: Deirdre of the Troubles

Eamon Carr’s verse play is an account of his time as a reporter in the North told via an old Irish fable

Eamon Carr: ‘I found the cumulative effect of the horror stories I was reporting on from the North difficult to shake off.’ Photograph: Eric Luke

Eamon Carr: ‘I found the cumulative effect of the horror stories I was reporting on from the North difficult to shake off.’ Photograph: Eric Luke

‘Yer man. Who does he think he is?” asks Eamon Carr, parodying possible reaction to his new book. A verse play, it occupies the Deirdre of the Sorrows fable to give an impressionistic account of his experiences as a reporter in Northern Ireland in the 1990s. The blend of Troubles and myth shows how humanity is helpless in the face of timeless violence.

Carr has long been a stencil on Ireland’s cultural cave wall through his sports, news and arts work for newspapers and radio. He has made a deep mark on music as a drummer and producer, and the Celtic spirals of his band, Horslips, have never stopped twirling.

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