UK experience suggests 2018 was lucrative for Irish Google staff

UK payout to their staff from share scheme came to an average of about €108,700

Google’s Irish staff shared €95.8 million in 2017, an average of €28,691 on top of salary and other benefits. Photograph: Hannibal Hanschke/File Photo/Reuters

Google’s Irish staff shared €95.8 million in 2017, an average of €28,691 on top of salary and other benefits. Photograph: Hannibal Hanschke/File Photo/Reuters

 

It looks like 2018 was a bumper year not just for Google but also for its Irish staff.

It appears they will have enjoyed a bumper payout from the company stock allocation scheme, which accounts for a portion of the pay of all Googlers. At least, that is if the experience of their British co-workers is anything to go by.

Google’s UK operation published its 2018 accounts this week showing that the payout to their 3,658 staff there from the share scheme came to a blunt average of £93,571 (€108,700).

The figure does come with some caveats because the average is hardly representative. Share allocation depends on a range of factors, not least how long a person has been with the company and the nature and seniority of their role.

Of course, that means some staff received considerably more than the £93,571 average.

But, overall, the £342.3 million allocated among staff was 56 per cent more than was distributed the previous year. On a per-capita basis, the rise is 44 per cent rise, reflecting, among other things, the 380 additional staff hired in the year.

Google’s Irish staff shared €95.8 million in 2017, an average of €28,691 on top of salary and other benefits.

We won’t know for some time exactly how they fared last year from their share allocation, as Ireland’s filing arrangements for company results are not as demanding in terms of timeliness as in the UK. And Ireland, with a greater proportion of sales roles and relatively fewer engineers in its local workforce, might not expect to precisely match the UK experience.

But still, a 44 per cent rise would bring the average payment to more than €41,000. Even a modestly lower increase would deliver a tidy return for the tech giant’s fast-growing Irish workforce.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
GO BACK
Error Image
The account details entered are not currently associated with an Irish Times subscription. Please subscribe to sign in to comment.
Comment Sign In

Forgot password?
The Irish Times Logo
Thank you
You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.
The Irish Times Logo
Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.
Screen Name Selection

Hello

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

The Irish Times Logo
Commenting on The Irish Times has changed. To comment you must now be an Irish Times subscriber.
SUBSCRIBE
Forgot Password
Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In

Your Comments
We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.