Deal with Chinese province Guangdong set to boost Irish trade

Chinese and Irish agencies and companies sign seven memoranda of understanding

Guangdong province leader  Hu ChunHua and Enterprise Ireland chief executive Julie Sinnamon at the Sino-Irish event in Dublin on Friday.

Guangdong province leader Hu ChunHua and Enterprise Ireland chief executive Julie Sinnamon at the Sino-Irish event in Dublin on Friday.

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State agencies and businesses including Alltech and Rinocloud signed agreements with organisations from China’s Guangdong province that could boost trade with one of the far eastern country’s wealthiest regions.

More than 250 Irish and Chinese companies and groups met at a function in Dublin on Friday to discuss opportunities presented by the UK’s departure from the European Union.

At the meeting Chinese and Irish bodies signed seven memoranda of understanding under which they agreed on co-operation that could to pave the way for increased trade between the two countries.

Cork-based Rinocloud, whose systems allow scientists and researchers to structure their data, signed a memo promising co-operation on artificial intelligence with Shenzhen Intebridge Technology Incubation.

Pearse Lyons’s brewing and nutrition specialist singed Alltech agreed a memo of understanding on aquatic research with Guangdong Evergreen Conglomerate.

Guangdong generates about 10 per cent of China’s wealth every year, making it the country’s strongest performing province, and is home Shenzhen, a major city and special economic zone.

The province’s government hosted Friday’s function, which Dublin Chamber of Commerce, development agencies Enterprise Ireland and IDA Ireland, along with the Chinese embassy, helped organise.

IDA Ireland and Enterprise Ireland signed memos on economic co-operation with Guangdong’s commerce department. Aircraft lessor AerCap linked with China Southern Airlines and Guangzhou Nansha Development Zone. Dublin Chamber joined forces with CCPIT Guangdong.

Dublin Chamber chief Mary Rose Burke said trade with China was a priority for the Republic. “I believe there are a lot of opportunities to increase trade across a huge variety of sectors, especially with the Guangdong province,” she added.

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