Irish-founded cleaning start-up Hassle.com acquired for €32m

Helpling and Hassle enable customers to book cleaners online or via smartphone app

On-demand cleaning start-up Hassle.com, co-founded by Irish woman Jules Coleman, has been acquired by German rival Helpling.

On-demand cleaning start-up Hassle.com, co-founded by Irish woman Jules Coleman, has been acquired by German rival Helpling.

 

On-demand cleaning start-up Hassle. com, co-founded by Irish woman Jules Coleman, has been acquired by German rival Helpling for a reported €32 million.

Both Helpling and Hassle.com enable customers to book a local, vetted cleaner online or via a smartphone app. Together Helpling and Hassle.com will operate in 14 markets holding strategic cities such as London, Berlin and Paris.

Helpling co-founder Benedikt Franke said Hassle is not only the market leader in the UK and Ireland, it also has very sophisticated technology and has built a brand that people associate with trust, quality and safety.

“This partnership combines Hassle.com’s expertise with Helpling’s international footprint and access to capital. It creates a very exciting global proposition and makes our combined company the strongest player in this space,” he added.

Hassle.com co-founder Alex Depledge said it is no secret that Helpling moves fast.

“Their ability to scale and raise money is impressive. This, combined with our ability to build depth in market and user loyalty, means that together we are a force to be reckoned with.”

Hassle.com will continue to operate under its established brand. The Hassle founding team will take on additional responsibilities within the group as global co-founders.

Founded by Coleman, Alex Depledge and Tom Nimmo, Hassle.com secured a $6 million (€4.7 million) investment from European venture capital firm Accel Partners in April 2014.

Helpling launched one year ago and is already leading across 12 markets. The company has raised €56.5 million from Lakestar, Mangrove, Rocket Internet and other high profile investors.

Tech.eu said the €32 million acquisition deal was mostly stock, with some cash.