Life sciences firm Malin acquires 33% of Wren Therapeutics

Company has option to increase shareholding to 67% under terms of transaction

The company’s proprietary technology can be broadly applied to the more than 30 human protein misfolding diseases

The company’s proprietary technology can be broadly applied to the more than 30 human protein misfolding diseases

 

Irish life sciences company Malin has acquired a 33 per cent shareholding of Wren Therapeutics, a newly created biopharmaceutical company based in Cambridge, UK.

Wren was formally founded as a business entity in 2016. Its focus is on drug discovery and subsequent clinical translation of molecules which will impact protein misfolding diseases.

The company’s proprietary technology can be broadly applied to the more than 30 human protein misfolding diseases.

These conditions include a number of significant and devastating major neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases as well as several non-neurological disorders including type-2 diabetes.

Under the terms of the transaction, Malin has an option to increase its shareholding in Wren to 67 per cent.

Malin chief executive Kelly Martin and Malin chief investment officer Adrian Howd will join the board of Wren.

In a statement, Malin said its chief technology officer Sam Cohen will be “closely involved” with all aspects of Wren including the “continued advancement of the technology and the subsequent assessment of opportunities for clinical progression”.

Intersection

Mr Martin said: “The creation of Wren provides an example of what is possible to accomplish at the intersection of a unique idea or set of ideas, clarity in understanding particular human health needs, diverse – in their approaches and backgrounds – world-class talent and, importantly, access to long-term, unencumbered and business-aligned capital.

“I have known Chris Dobson for well over a decade and have the highest regard for him personally as well as professionally. We have some unfinished business to tend to in the area of certain neurological afflictions and we are delighted to be working alongside Chris and his colleagues in tackling this long-standing area of significant human need.”

Prof Chris Dobson of the University of Cambridge, and a founder of Wren, said Alzheimer’s disease and its related conditions “represent a huge and increasing challenge to global health care in the 21st century”.

“Wren is built on the results of many years of scientific research into the fundamental origins of these conditions, and is uniquely placed to develop rational therapeutic strategies based on the novel principles that have emerged from such studies,” he said.

“We are delighted to have the opportunity to work with Malin to create a programme that is directed at delivering much needed treatments to patients suffering from these debilitating illnesses.”