Docklands businesses pledge €100,000 to local education initiative

US property firm teams up with funds industry scheme to help north inner-city communities

Basis.point chairman Clive Bellows (centre) noted that communities in the shadow of the IFSC were among the most disadvantaged in the State.

Basis.point chairman Clive Bellows (centre) noted that communities in the shadow of the IFSC were among the most disadvantaged in the State.

 

Kennedy Wilson, the US property investor, has teamed up with Basis.point, the Irish funds industry charity initiative on a €100,000 pledge to support new child development initiatives for underprivileged communities in Dublin’s north inner city.

The money will help fund two initiatives over five years. One is the National College of Ireland’s (NCI) early-learning scheme for families living in temporary accommodation, called Home from Home. The other is Archways, an after-school mentor programme for children between the ages of 10 and 13 who have talent in academics, art, sport or music.

Jason Byers, who is the property investor’s head of residential in Ireland, said the two programmes would have a “tangible impact on the fundamental early years of local children’s education”.

“Kennedy Wilson’s large presence in Dublin’s north docks makes this commitment to supporting the local community with meaningful initiatives all the more relevant,” he said, adding that a number of its staff would be volunteering directly with the programmes next year.

Clive Bellows, chairman of Basis.point, noted that communities in the shadow of the International Financial Services Centre were among the most disadvantaged in the State and face enormous challenges in their day-to-day lives.

“We hope that with early intervention we can help break the cycle of disadvantage,” he said.

NCI president Gina Quinn said support from corporate partners had helped its early-learning initiatives to reach more than 10,000 inner-city children, young people and their families every year.