Manchester United could generate €30m per year from stadium naming rights

Market rates for stadium naming rights grew to €152.7 million in 2017 from €84m in 2013

Old Trafford was found to be the stadium that could generate the most from naming sponsorship in the Premier League. Photograph: iStock

Old Trafford was found to be the stadium that could generate the most from naming sponsorship in the Premier League. Photograph: iStock

 

Manchester United could generate up to €29.5 million per season if they were to sell naming rates for their stadium, a study by corporate finance advisor Duff & Phelps has found.

The study of Premier League clubs suggests that Manchester United could be the biggest beneficiary if it were to sell naming rights for its 75,600 seater stadium, achieving almost €8 million more than its neighbour Manchester City, which sold the rights for its stadium to Etihad for €21.5 million.

Rates for naming stadiums owned by Premier League clubs increased more than 80 per cent in the last five years as a result of the growth in the value of Premier League rights, the study found.

Market rates for stadium naming rights have grown from €84 million in 2013 to €152.7 million last year.

The top six clubs who regularly play in European competitions account for over 77 per cent of the €152 million potential with the two Manchester clubs alone generating over 33 per cent.

Aside from Manchester United and City, Chelsea are in third place according to the survey, and could achieve over €20 million per season while Tottenham Hotspur, looking to move into a new stadium next season, could generate over €16 million a year.

Trevor Birch, former Chelsea chief executive and now a managing director at Duff & Phelps, said sponsorship demand for the content rights of the top clubs in the premier league show “no sign of abating”.

“We have seen enormous increases in rights values of the elite clubs over the last couple of years, especially regarding shirt branding and product endorsement.

“Although the UK hasn’t embraced stadium naming rights as enthusiastically as the United States, its potential to become an important revenue stream is highlighted by these figures,” he said.

Niall Cribben, a director in the company’s Irish operation, said the research shows the commercial opportunities for sporting organisations in Ireland.

“There is a huge opportunity for stadiums in Ireland to explore stronger commercial agreements with top brands. This will be good for the brands, good for the stadiums and the teams that fill them and ultimately good for fans as stadium experiences will undoubtedly improve,” said Mr Cribben.