Bord Pleanála gives green light to 564 ‘build-to-rent’ apartments in Sandyford

Granting of permission supersedes permission granted two years ago for 460 apartments at the site

Objections focused on concerns regarding the height and scale of the proposal, and that it would conflict with the proposal to have a landmark building of notable design on the adjoining site

Objections focused on concerns regarding the height and scale of the proposal, and that it would conflict with the proposal to have a landmark building of notable design on the adjoining site

Your Web Browser may be out of date. If you are using Internet Explorer 9, 10 or 11 our Audio player will not work properly.
For a better experience use Google Chrome, Firefox or Microsoft Edge.

 

An Bord Pleanála has given permission for “fast-track” plans to construct 564 “build-to-rent” apartments on a former Aldi site in Sandyford in south Dublin.

The appeals board granted planning permission to Sandyford GP Ltd for the apartments in six blocks ranging from five storeys to 17 storeys on the former Aldi site at Carmanhall Road, Sandyford Business District.

The granting of permission supersedes permission granted two years ago for 460 apartments at the site. Apart from scale, the main differences between the two developments is that the new project is for the “build-to-rent” market.

Objectors had raised concerns over the “build-to-rent” aspect of the proposal. However, the appeals board’s senior planning inspector in the case, Erika Casey, said she was “satisfied that the proposal will contribute positively to addressing the acute shortage of apartment development in the Sandyford area, and will provide much needed high-quality apartments to cater for local demand”.

Ms Casey said there have been no “build-to-rent” apartment schemes permitted in the Sandyford area before now. “I consider, therefore, that the development will bring further choice and diversity to the housing market.”

The Stillorgan Woods Residents’ Association was one of three parties to raise concerns over the plan. Objections focused on concerns regarding the height and scale of the proposal, and that it would conflict with the proposal to have a landmark building of notable design on the adjoining site.

Twin structure 

However, the applicants told the appeals board that the 17-storey tower was appropriate in order to match the height of the Sentinel building, and create a twin structure at each end of the pedestrian thoroughfare.

The proposal, designed by Henry J Lyons Architects, is higher than the development granted planning permission in 2018, and Ms Casey said “there is a clear and robust case for the additional height proposed in architectural and urban design terms”.