Bank bill for trackers, K Club in court and Ryanair facing stormy weather

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The K Club golf resort in Straffan, Co Kiladare is named as a defendant in a High Court case over an alleged threat made to a former employee. Photograph: Alan Betson

The K Club golf resort in Straffan, Co Kiladare is named as a defendant in a High Court case over an alleged threat made to a former employee. Photograph: Alan Betson

 

Bank of Ireland has paid out over €138 million in refunds and compensation to customers caught up in the tracker mortgage scandal, chief executive Francesca McDonagh will tell an Oireachtas committee this morning, writes Joe Brennan

Meanwhile, a former manager at the K Club has started a High Court action against the club, its owner, Michael Smurfit, and a club employee over alleged threats made against him following an incident alleging call girls were accommodated at the resort.

Ryanair is looking to sit down with its Irish pilots to avert strike action, writes Barry O’Halloran. It comes as the airline is facing further claims from cabin crew and pilots in other countries. And if that wasn’t enough, the EU has announced an investigation into the deal struck by the airline to operate flights from Montpelier in the south of France.

And it isn’t just Ryanair that concerns the Commission. The shortage of housing supply and the significant increases in property prices are posing a major risk to the Irish economy, it has warned in its latest post-troika update. Sarah Bardon saw the report.

Listed insurance group FBD Holdings has commissioned law firm William Fry the carry out an investigation into internal allegations made against chief executive Fiona Muldoon, which the insurer disclosed in a stock exchange announcement last week. Joe Brennan has the details

Ever wondered why wages aren’t growing even though productivity is? The OECD says “superstar” tech firms could be to blame, writes Eoin Burke-Kennedy, with productivity being driven by a small number of innovative firms that employ relatively few people.

Still with tech, Google’s site reliability team is looking for lazy engineers, writes Ciara O’Brien, but not in the way you might think.

And Karlin Lillington writes that California is once again leading the way in the US with a new data privacy law that is likely to be a blow to companies that thought they could ringfence exposure to the new EU GDPR regime.

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