Una Mullally

Society, life and culture on the edge

Dublin Web Summit makes a point about gender.

If you believe what you read and see about internet-y people, then it would be easy to draw the conclusion that like many industries, it’s a boy’s club. Check out lists of influential people in Wired, or look up a …

Mon, Jul 16, 2012, 18:39

   

If you believe what you read and see about internet-y people, then it would be easy to draw the conclusion that like many industries, it’s a boy’s club. Check out lists of influential people in Wired, or look up a programme of speakers at a tech conference, and it’s a sea of 30-something white blokes, all half-smiles, questionable hair, and the type of nondescript v-neck sweaters that people with loads of theoretical money buy.

Enter the Dublin Web Summit, the very successful gathering of the type of online entrepreneurs that are underscored in the web’s black book of young hot (generally male) things. This year, the web summit is making a point about gender inequality by announcing their first ten speakers as ten women. With 200 speakers at the event this October, it will, of course, still be male dominated, but it’s encouraging that a conference with such a high profile and plenty of kudos is putting women in the spotlight. Lip service? Maybe, but at least it’s starting a conversation.

Meanwhile, does it really matter that Marissa Mayer is pregnant? As in front-page-of-Mashable-matter?