Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh, inventor of Sugru, said she wanted to make a product to help tackle today’s “throwaway culture”

The Irish-owned company behind Sugru, a mouldable glue product, expects growth of around 50 per cent next year following the launch of a new product. (...)

Rhianna Pratchett: “When I was a kid I thought fighting robots from the future or killing aliens was just what women did.”

While most children might dream of becoming doctors, lawyers or even fighter pilots, Rhianna Pratchett’s ambitions were always somewhat grander in sca(...)

Jean Scales who lives in Luton: “We did not get the right information when we were voting. They should have told us what would happen.” Photograph: Joanne O’Brien

Belfast-born Jean Scales is one of many volunteers who help out each day at the Luton Irish Forum – a body that was set up to help ageing Irish immigr(...)

Sugru inventor Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh: “We’re looking for Sugru to become as well known as Coca-Cola.” Photograph: Matteo Valfre

The company behind Sugru, a fix-all mouldable glue product invented by Irish woman Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh, has raised £1.9 million (€2.24 million) fro(...)

Founder Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh: Sugru is looking to expand into Canada, Australia and New Zealand as well as extending its reach in Europe, the company said

Irish investors can invest in mouldable glue company Sugru for as little as 10, as the firm gets its latest crowdfunding campaign off the ground. It(...)

Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh with her invention Sugru, a mouldable glue. Photograph: Andrew Testa/the New York Times

It can fix a broken statue, repair a frayed iPhone cable, add a rubbery grip to a kitchen knife, make those Bose earbuds fit better, repair a leaky bo(...)

Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh Inventor Inventor Jane Ní Dhulchaointigh has a warmth and an ability to parlay tech into plain English so that the rest of u(...)

Tanya Kiang - Director, the Gallery of Photography Worst advice: “Don’t waste your brains on the arts.” Tanya Kiang’s father was an as(...)

Above, from left (standing): Lara Cassidy, TCD’s genetics department; Marina Lynch of TCD’s institute of neuroscience; Aoife Gowen of DIT’s environmental health department. Seated, from left: Annie Curtis of Trinity’s biomedical science Institute and Aoife McLysaght of TCD’s genetics department. Photograph:  Bryan O’Brien

Ada Lovelace – few people know her name, but more should and soon will.She was the daughter of the poet Byron, a mathematical prodigy, and the world’s(...)