Yellow jersey winner Chris Froome of Team Sky near the Arc de Triomphe during the 109.5-km final stage of the 102nd Tour de France. Photograph: Reuters

Despite disappointment from bout of illness there was much learned from this102nd Tour

Dan Martin  greets fans before the start of Stage 19 of the  Tour de France between Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne and La Toussuire. Photograph: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

`The last time we went up it the fans had set up what they called Irish corner'

 Chris Froome: the race leader from  Team Sky  had urine thrown in his face by a spectator. Photograph: Bryn Lennon/Getty

A spectator throwing urine at Chris Froome is a worrying development

Dan Martin believes Tour de France leader Chris Froome still has plenty to do in order tow in the race.

Searing heat means demand for water is higher than ever while Froome has work to do

“One team that certainly got things right is Chris Froome’s Sky. He blasted clear and dominated the stage.” Photograph: Yoan Valat/Epa.

Display suggests we got things very wrong in managing our rest day

Dan Martin: I’m feeling confident about my chances of chasing a victory when the race hits the high mountains in the days ahead”

It was an opportunity lost due to poor positioning

Tour de France leader Tony Martin was forced to retire from race after sustaining a broken collarbone in a crash. Photograph: EP.

Seeing yellow jersey of Tony Martin forced to retire from race through injury was a huge pity

The peloton hits the cobbles on stage four of the Tour, a 223km stage between Seraing and Cambrai. Photograph: Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

I’d hoped to be there for the win but in the end it was close but no cigar, says Dan Martin

Spectators try to cool off with cold water on the side of the street during first stage of the 2015 Tour de France in Utrecht, Netherlands. Photograph: Marcel van Hoorn/EPA

Main plan was to stay cool before the time trial, which meant ice on neck and wrists

Dan Martin: “I had a frustrating spring with crashes and I’m really motivated to do something in this Tour.” Photographer: Dara Mac Dónaill

The work is done; now I just need to get through that tricky first week in one piece

A babygirl watches the pack riding at the start of the 19th stage of the 69th edition of “La Vuelta”. Photograph: Jaime Reina /AFP/Getty Images

Battle for sixth will depend on climbs, time trials and, perhaps, antibiotics

Canadian rider Ryder Hesjedal of Garmin Sharp team celebrates winning the 14th stage of the Vuelta over 200.8km from Santander to La Camperona, northern Spain, but had to endure accusations of riding a motorised bicycle. Photograph: Javier Lizon/EPA

Heat of the moment fight an unwelcome distraction from an amazing stage race

A steep climb on Sunday’s 15th stage of the Vuelta a España between Oviedo and Lagos de Covadonga. Photograph: EPA/Javier Lizon.

Had I not crashed, I dare say I might have been able to try for the win

 The pack in action during the 13th stage of the Vuelta a Espana  from Belorado to  Cabarceno yesterday. Photograph: Javier Lizon/EPA

Elephants and Zebra aplenty but stage win remains an endangered species

Alberto Contador of the Tinkoff-Saxo team in action during yesterday’s 10th stage of the Vuelta a España, where he finished fourth and took over the red jersey.

The important thing is that I got around safe, and to move up on the general classification is a bonus

The pack in action during the ninth stage of the VVuelta Ciclista cycling race, of 185km between Carboneras de Guadazaon and Aramon Valdelinares. Photograph: Javier Lizon/EPA

Vuelta Diary: It was really nice to finally be able to race properly on a climb

The pack in action during the seventh stage of the  Vuelta a Espana cycling tour, over 169km from Alhendin to Alcaudete, southern Spain.  Photograph: Javier Lizon

‘Unfortunately the 2012 world road race champion Philippe Gilbert just pipped me at the line, getting past for fifth‘

Dan Martin (blue jersey) finishes fifth behind stage winner John Degenkolb of Germany in Cordoba yesterday. photograph: Jose Jordan/Getty

Fifth on stage four a good return after a flat sprint

The peleton in action in action during the second stage of the Vuelta a España over 174.4km from Algeciras to San Fernando, southern Spain. Photograph: Carrasco Ragel/EPA

Vuelta Diary: ‘We got around safely and have plenty of time to make up lost ground’

Orica-GreenEdge’s Australian rider Michael Matthews celebrates his stage  victory at theTour of Spain, a 174.3km stage between Sober and Lago de Sanabria. Photograph:  Jose Jordan/AFP/Getty Images.

Run-ins are tough so my big objective is to stay safe and keep out of trouble

Katusha Team’s Daniel Moreno on his way to winning the fourth stage of the  Tour of Spain yesterday from  Lalin and Fisterra. Photograph: Miguel   Riopa/AFP/Getty Images

Although I felt pretty rough all day I was never in any danger of getting dropped

Obviously my cousin Nicolas Roche and I aren’t team-mates like when we were in the London Olympics together, but we still may be able to help each other out. Photograph: Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

Things could get interesting in the weeks ahead with my cousin looking like a real contender

Nicolas Roche celebrates winning the second stage of the Tour of Spain. Photograph:  Miguel Vidal/Reuters

Goal now is to get through today’s stage without losing any time

Dan Martin  crosses the finish line ahead of Jakob Fuglsang of Denmark, rear, to win the ninth stage of the Tour de France. from  Saint-Girons to n Bagneres-de-Bigorre in the  Pyrenees. Photo: Laurent Rebours/AP)

My stage win was an obvious highlight but racing in Corsica and Nice too will linger long in the memory as will the support of th(...)

Spectators shelter from rain as a group of riders pass  during the 204.5 km 19th stage of the centenary Tour de France  from Bourg d’Oisans to Le Grand Bornand, in the French Alps. Photograph: Eric Gaillard/Reuters

Illness makes the mountains a struggle and the apocalyptic weather didn’t help

AG2r La Mondiale team rider Christophe Riblon of France on l’Alpe d’Huez yesterday on his way to winning Stage 18 of the Tour de France. Photograph: Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters

‘It is just an unfortunate set of circumstances. I picked the worst day in the Tour to get sick.’

I thought that I’d get a bit of leeway in this stage  but instead the Sky team of race leader Chris Froome started chasing me down. Photograph: Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

Other teams were playing games which wouldn’t let me away

Overall leader Christopher Froome faces the media during rest day.

‘I am the patron of the Cycle4Life charity and the proceeds for selling the t-shirts will be used to help the Temple Street childr(...)

Fans run alongside Nairo Quintana of Colombia and Chris Froome of  Britain  during stage 15 of the  Tour de France, from Givors to Mont Ventoux. Photograph:  Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

I am just over four minutes back from second place. I think anything can happen still

 Team Saxo-Tinkoff drives the pace at the head of the group during stage 13 of the  Tour de France. Their teamwork was impressive in the day’s final break. Photograph:  Bryn Lennon/Getty Images

A day like this in the wind shows that anything can happen

Dan Martin’s Garmin-Sharp team-mate Jack Bauer is treated along with Lotto Belisol rider Gregory Henderson during yesterday’s 12th stage. Photograph: AP Photo

‘It could have been a ruinous end to the day, but overall it wasn’t bad’

Omega Pharma-Quick Step team rider Tony Martin of Germany cycles past the Mont Saint-Michel during the 32 km individual time trial 11th stage of the Tour de France yesterday. Photograph: Reuters

The heavyweights take full advantage when the land is flat

A hairdresser combs a customer’s hair in a hairdressing salon as the peleton makes its way through the tenth stage of the centenary Tour de France from Saint-Gildas-des-Bois to Saint-Malo. Photograph: Eric Gaillard/Reuters

Despite the crosswind and late crash , the first day back racing after my stage win swas pretty relaxing

Overall leader Christopher Froome (yellow helmet) rides with his team-mates during training on rest day of the Tour de France.

The plane to Brittany ended up being the most horrendous flight of my life

Dan Martin  celebrates after winning stage nine of the Tour de France to Bagneres-de-Bigorre yesterday. Photograph:  Bryn Lennon/Getty Images.

Irish stage-winner Dan Martin reflects on his victory in his Tour de France diary

The pack of riders  during the 205.5 km seventh stage of the centenary Tour de France  race from Montpellier to Albi.

Dan Martin’s Diary: Stage 7

Andre Greipel of Germany  wins  the sixth stage of the Tour de France  in Montpellier yesterday. Photograph: Laurent Rebours/AP

Dan Martin Diary – Day 6

Team-mate  Christian Vande Velde crashed with 15km to go on the stage and was pretty banged up. Photograph:  Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

I’m feeling looser although my team-mates have picked up some knocks on the way

Daniel Martin’s Garmin-Sharp team inon yesterday’s stage of the Tour de France, a 25km team time trial in Nice. The team finished sixth but, overall, Martin was ipleased with the team’s coinsistency. Photograph:  Doug Pensinger/Getty Images.

With five of our Garmin-Sharp nine climbers, we did well to get so close

The peloton negotiates a climb during stage three from Ajaccio to Calvi in Corsica.

There will be nerves at the start, but I think those nerves will keep us on our toes and hopefully lead to a great result

Jan Bakelants of Belgium crosses the finish line ahead of the sprinting pack to win the second stage of the Tour de France  over 156 kilometres which  started in Bastia and finished in Ajaccio, Corsica. Photograph: Laurent Rebours/AP

No glory for the team but at least I avoided the first day’s big crash

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