Tone has changed at Old Trafford as things may be coming to a head for David Moyes

It was left to Patrice Evra to sound convincing and impressive at yesterday’s media gathering

Manchester United manager David Moyes during a training session at the AON Training Complex in Manchester yesterday.

Manchester United manager David Moyes during a training session at the AON Training Complex in Manchester yesterday.

Tue, Mar 18, 2014, 23:06

For David Moyes it was the first time he had faced questions about whether his position at Manchester United was vulnerable. Was his future on the line? Had there been any assurances from the people at the top of the club? How much longer could he expect the supporters to stomach it?

The tone has certainly changed since those wretched defeats by Olympiakos and Liverpool and there were even more seats filled inside the Europa Suite at Old Trafford for his latest press conference than that day, last July, when he walked out in front of all the flashing bulbs for the first time as United’s manager.

The job, he now admits, has been harder than he had imagined. Another bad result against Olympiakos, who lead 2-0 from the first leg, and the bottom line is no one can be sure whether the club’s supporters will be able to keep in all that pent-up frustration. Or, more to the point, how the Glazer family will consider the possibility of no more Champions League for at least 18 months.

There is certainly the sense that things may be coming to a head and that takes some doing bearing in mind every single piece of information out of Old Trafford since last summer has pointed to this being a club that want to operate to different principles from their rivals.

Imagine, for example, if Manuel Pellegrini had taken Manchester City down to seventh in his first season at the club, and on the brink of surrendering any last chance of silverware before the clocks had turned back. A manager at Chelsea would have been escorted off the premises long ago.

It is not since the end of October, when Norwich lost 4-0 in the League Cup, that Moyes’ men have won at Old Trafford by a score that would see them go through on aggregate. They have managed only 18 home goals in the league – the same as bottom-placed Fulham – and it is not always entirely convincing listening to Moyes.

This was his opportunity to remove some of the pessimism with a statement of boldness and conviction but, if anything, it was the guy sitting to his right who sounded the more impressive.

“Everyone wants to fight for this club,” Patrice Evra, below, said. “Everyone loves this club. We know we had a bad game in the first leg. I think even a three-year-old Man United fan has been hurting by all the problems. But in life you always have a second chance. I’m not telling you we are going to qualify but I can promise we are all going to fight and respect the shirt.”

Sympathetic meetings
Moyes talked about the sympathetic meetings he had had with Alex Ferguson. “He has been incredibly supportive. I speak to him regularly. I see him at the games, I have a few minutes with him, he told me when I came in it would be a difficult job but he’s always there to help.”

What he really needs, though, is the players’ backing and the latest leaks out of the dressing room are not exactly glowing for Moyes and his staff, in particular the coach who now goes by a deeply unflattering nickname. Footballers can be brutal sometimes and, behind his back, that coach is apparently being referred to as “f**k off (name)” – on the basis that is so often the first response when they hear his instructions.

Plainly, though, it is not ideal, at a time when the manager is desperately trying to create the impression that everyone is pulling in the same direction. Has he lost the dressing room? The way it has been described is that he never actually had the dressing room. That does not mean the players were against his appointment. Indeed, some were actually relieved, for selfish motives, that it was not Jose Mourinho, on the basis they had seen his treatment of Iker Casillas at Real Madrid and - footballers always thinking of themselves - suspected he would bring in his own players.

Yet Moyes had to win their full approval and, unfortunately for him, that process has never really happened. Nemanja Vidic’s decision to cut himself free this summer is a case in point. Vidic was not even willing to discuss the possibility of a contract extension.

There have even been sporadic complaints from players behind the scenes - and this is maybe the most surprising part - about Ryan Giggs. A legend at Old Trafford, Giggs is now player-coach in a dressing room that operates in a different way from when Ferguson ruled the place. Giggs, one imagines, understands that points should come before popularity.

As always in football, the only way of shifting the mood is to start winning. “I have a great job and I know exactly the direction I want to go in,” Moyes said. “It has not been the season we hoped but I have ideas of what I want to do and what I want to put in place when the time is right. But the most important thing now is to get the Olympiakos game played and hopefully get through.”
Guardian Service

Sign In

Forgot Password?

Sign Up

The name that will appear beside your comments.

Have an account? Sign In

Forgot Password?

Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In or Sign Up

Thank you

You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.

Hello, .

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

Thank you for registering. Please check your email to verify your account.

We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.