Mourinho masterclass proves too much for PSG boss Laurent Blanc

If football is a combination of tactics and emotion, then Chelsea manager got both right

Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho: “What really stood out was the sense of meticulous planning behind Chelsea’s victory.” Photograph: Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho: “What really stood out was the sense of meticulous planning behind Chelsea’s victory.” Photograph: Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

Thu, Apr 10, 2014, 01:00


One of the striking aspects of Chelsea’s progress to the Champions League semi-finals on Wednesday night was the demeanour of Laurent Blanc during and after Paris Saint-Germain’s 2-0 defeat in the second leg at Stamford Bridge.

In the opening quarter of the match Blanc was the most visible presence on the touchline, patrolling his rectangle with a reassuring strut. When Eden Hazard left the pitch after 18 minutes Blanc was first to offer him a consolatory handshake.

He even gave André Schürrle a paternal pat as he ran on in Hazard’s place. Two goals up, two thirds of the tie gone. Blanc was winning this.

The change in his manner by the end was striking. As Chelsea began to drive PSG back with a well-practised switch to accurate, muscular, direct football, Blanc seemed to slump.

At one point he rubbed furiously at his temples with both hands. He made changes, waving his players on energetically, but none that made any real difference to the game’s altered momentum. By the time Mourinho made his dash down the touchline to the corner flag there was no need to dodge his fellow manager. Blanc had sat down; or rather been sat down.

Unusually meek
Afterwards PSG’s manager seemed unusually meek; not just disappointed but with the chastened air of a managerial Salieri who has just spent the last two hours plonking gamely at his chords while next to him some traumatically gifted improviser tinkles away with terrifying alacrity.

There has already been a great deal of praise for Mourinho’s role in Chelsea’s victory, his success in bundling a depleted team past lavishly appointed and gratingly overconfident A-list opponents.

If football is a combination of tactics and emotion, then Mourinho got both right. He made his plan. And he made up a story to go with it, the well-pitched motivational underdog schtick that dovetailed perfectly with tactics designed to expose PSG’s most accessible weakness, discomfort in the face of relentless muscular pressure at the heart of their defence.

This was both a tactical success and a coup de théâtre, not to mention a first notch on the all-time Mourinho hit list in his Chelsea 2.0 period, an Elvis in Vegas moment for a well-worn favourite now into his middle years.

For all the emotion of the moment, though, what really stood out was the sense of meticulous planning behind Chelsea’s victory. “We worked a lot all week on scenarios – one-nil, two-nil, three-one,” Terry said at the final whistle. “For every scenario, we had a gameplan and once again we got it right.”

Defining quality
And this really is Mourinho’s defining quality on these occasions. His habit of staging practice matches to replicate having men sent off or chasing a game is well documented.

To see such thoroughness in action at this level, Mourinho changing the course of the game with his best player injured and powerful opponents already in control, was fascinating. It may even have been salutary for those competing Premier League managers who seem to come out match after match with a single tactical plan in mind, where Mourinho has two or three contingencies lurking in his back pocket.

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