Next Sunday's showdown with England is beginning to look like a potential title decider

Brian O'Driscoll is congratulated by team-mates after crossing from close range for Ireland's third try just after the half-time break. photograph: dan sheridan/inpho

Brian O'Driscoll is congratulated by team-mates after crossing from close range for Ireland's third try just after the half-time break. photograph: dan sheridan/inpho

Mon, Feb 4, 2013, 00:00

One down, four to go. In addition to Ireland and England, against all expectations that now applies to the Italians as well, who didn’t so much upset the apple cart as lob a grenade into it yesterday with their stunning and deserved 23-18 win over an off-colour France in Rome yesterday. The net effect is to make next Sunday’s showdown in the Aviva Stadium between Ireland and England appear even more of a potential title decider.

Both teams come into the game buoyed by augmenting end-of-November wins over Argentina and the All Blacks with additional momentum from a stirring first round of matches to the world’s oldest rugby competition – a weekend which eclipsed any in last season’s non-vintage tournament.

After toppling the reigning Grand Slam champions Wales by 30-22 in the Millennium Stadium in Saturday’s thriller, the biggest concern from an Irish perspective is the greater physical toll exacted of them.

Statistics, damned lies and statistics maybe, for although Wales had better figures in every single one of the official Accenture stats, they didn’t in the only one that really matters. Nevertheless, in ultimately winning with 37 per cent of the possession (and 35 per cent of the territory) Ireland were credited with 176 tackles during the course of the 80 minutes, and their own tally will assuredly be higher than that.

Sleight of hand

Rarely has Murray Mexted’s recourse to “the ebb and flow of psychological energy” appeared more apt and, as ever, the crowd were an accurate barometer of the game’s mood. So subdued initially were home team and crowd alike that the 14th minute rendition of The Fields shortly after Brian O’Driscoll’s sleight of hand and vision had set up the first try for Simon ‘Lionel’ Zebo echoed around the sun-kissed Millennium Stadium without a murmur of interruption. But by the very end of a frenzied second half, Irish players were throwing any and all of their bodies on the line.


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