Impressive show of masculinity from intercounty hurlers leading by example

These players are skilled exponents in the finer points of a code bordering on an art form

Kilkenny  manager Brian Cody speaks to Tommy Walsh before introducing him  as a second-half substitute during the Leinster GAA Hurling Senior Championship semi-final against Galway.  Photograph: James Crombie/Inpho

Kilkenny manager Brian Cody speaks to Tommy Walsh before introducing him as a second-half substitute during the Leinster GAA Hurling Senior Championship semi-final against Galway. Photograph: James Crombie/Inpho

Fri, Jul 4, 2014, 11:00

How often have we heard the phrase “proud hurling county” used to elicit some semblance of hope for a team that are, to put it mildly, struggling in the championship maelstrom? Or the term “proud hurling man” when defending some under-pressure manager.

All of us hurling heads have heard of the Rattler Byrne, Christy Ring, Mick Mackey, Jimmy Doyle and Nicky Rackard. We could reel off the names of another few dozen hurling heroes. All proud hurling men from proud hurling counties.

The last seven days has thrown many of the familiar names into the public domain again.

Brian Cody, Tommy Walsh, Jackie Tyrell, Cillian Buckley, TJ Reid, Conor Cooney, Kevin Moran, Brick Walsh, Chrissy O’Connell, Declan Sherlock, Kieran O’Connell, Francis Fullerton, Séamus Hughes, John O’Dwyer, Stephen McAree, Kevin Kelly. Even more proud hurling men.

What can we write about Brian Cody that hasn’t already been written? He shuffled the deck again before last Saturday’s game in Tullamore and came up with another new combination which did the business.

Tommy Walsh is finding favour again in a new role but he’s still Tommy Walsh, the hero, the legend, as brave and honest a hurler that has ever played the game. He took a heavy late tackle last Saturday and could have drawn at least a yellow card for his opponent, but while visibly shaken he got up and trotted back into his position.

We’ve come to expect that manliness from all Cody’s teams and

Tommy is the perfect example of all that is manly about hurling.

Jackie Tyrell was back to his best at corner back. Cillian Buckley is settling in to be a competent wing back while TJ is showing a consistency that has him moving into the player of the year category.

Conor Cooney was one of the few Galway players who could have been happy with his performance last weekend.

While Waterford put themselves back on the championship path, seasoned campaigners were to the fore again. Kevin Moran and Brick Walsh have been the fulcrum of this team for a while and are still the top performers.

Chrissy O’Connell might be a new name to many but he delivered a man-of-the-match performance for Antrim against Offaly and will be heard of in the future.

But what about Declan Sherlock, Kieran O’Connell, Francis Fullerton, Séamus Hughes, John O Dwyer, Stephen McAree and Kevin Kelly? Proud hurling men all.

They brought a significant amount to last week’s hurling world, just like the household names already mentioned.

They are proud hurling men, or maybe apostles would be a better description. They are playing against the wind much of the time, but they are believers and are carrying on their proselytising with impressive enthusiasm in a province where, in Gaelic games, football is king.

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