Austin Duffy: ‘All these things that are happening in the book could happen to any of us and I hope it speaks to the human condition.’

Without cancer we would never have evolution, and it’s around the relationship between the two that US-based Irish oncologist Austin Duffy’s first nov(...)

US biotech company Vaccinogen is setting up a research lab on DCU’s campus to develop vaccines that attack any cancer cells left over after surgery to reduce cancer recurrence

A US company looking for a research base found one in Dublin, but in the process also found something unexpected – a technology that could revolutioni(...)

Researchers at University College Cork have developed a compound from tree berries which has shown the potential to significantly reduce size of tumou(...)

Many people take supplements of vitamins A, C and E, thinking these antioxidants will help to ward off cancer

About two years ago I announced to my wife at breakfast my intention to start taking a regular omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplement, but added(...)

Last November there was public dismay when the Department of Education and Skills (DES) inspectorate report discovered weaknesses in the teaching of I(...)

“While it’s easy to dismantle the arguments of anti-fluoridation campaigners, it is exhausting and detrimental to the public understanding of science and medicine.” Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

In Stanley Kubrick’s seminal cold war satire Dr Strangelove, there’s a wonderfully off-the-wall scene where the increasingly unhinged Gen Ripper outli(...)

New research emanating from the US has sparked fresh debate about whether certain forms of cancer should be classified as cancers at all.The issue has(...)

A radiographer prepares a woman for a breast screening. US researchers are suggesting that screening strategies need to be personalised and not all abnormal growths should be called cancers.

Low-risk growths in the breast, prostate and elsewhere should no longer be called cancer and screening efforts to spot them should be cut back, a wor(...)

Headlines announcing a 71 per cent increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer in men with high levels of fatty acids derived from fish oils were (...)

Before you give up eating oily fish or reduce your intake of omega -3 supplements it is worth looking at the research in more detail.

The headlines announcing a 71 per cent increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer in men with high levels of fatty acids derived from fish oils are (...)