Happy Birthday Misao Okawa. The world’s oldest woman is 117 today. And it’s not surprising that she lives in Japan, which has the highest life expecta(...)

That rising economic tides do not lift all boats is well recognised. Research presented at the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) conferenc(...)

A culture of “low expectations” and a limited supply of appropriate training courses have been identified as key barriers to people with intellectual disabilities entering further education. Photograph: Getty Images.

A culture of “low expectations” and a limited supply of appropriate training courses have been identified as key barriers to people with intellectual (...)

The research suggests those in the middle suffered the greatest contraction in wealth as a result of the downturn.

Self-employed people outside of the agricultural sector and those on middle and lower incomes bore the brunt of the recession, according to a study b(...)

Overall, death rates have been falling for over half a century, but the rate of improvement across social groups varied greatly during the boom, Prof Richard Layte of the ESRI said. Photograph: Getty Images

Death rates in the most deprived parts of the State are up to six times higher than in more affluent areas, a conference on health inequalities has he(...)

The ESRI research adds to the science supporting further measures to reduce alcohol consumption, by marking the role played by digestive diseases (notably cirrhosis caused by excess drinking) in the mortality rates between rich and poor. Photograph: The Irish Times

Many of the fruits of the Celtic Tiger era may be gone, frittered away or shrunken in value, but growing life expectancy stands as one of the few last(...)

 Prof Richard Layte of the ESRI said the research provided the first analysis of the way differentials in mortality changed during the last three decades in Ireland. Photograph: Frank Miller/The Irish Times

The wealthiest groups in society enjoyed disproportionate gains in life expectancy and reductions in death rates during the boom years of the Celtic T(...)

Key driver in improved mortality rate has been reductions in smoking. Photograph: The Irish Times

Life expectancy in Ireland has increased by 15 years since 1950, principally due to reductions in smoking, according to new research.However, changing(...)

Classical economics was built around the notion that people’s behaviour responds to prices in a way that makes markets work. While price does influenc(...)

Research was based on data from Community Innovation Survey data over the period between 2004 and 2008.   Photograph: Danny Lawson/PA Wire

Irish firms with international trade links are more likely to invest in innovation; have a higher probability of adopting new technologies; and are, i(...)