Judge Yvonne Murphy: UCD awarded her an honorary degree of doctor of laws last December, citing several of her achievements including being called to both the English and Northern Irish Bar. Photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

Judge Yvonne Murphy’s appointment as chairwoman of the commission of investigation into matters related to mother and baby homes is her latest such ro(...)

Part of a  protest last month following the revelations about the Tuam mother-and-baby home and deaths babies in other  State-run institutions. File photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

The Government has appointed Judge Yvonne Murphy to chair the Commission of Investigation into mother-and-baby homes. However, speaking this afternoon(...)

Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan was told today it was essential all relevant institutions be included within the remit of the Commission of Investigation into Mother and Baby Homes. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times.

Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan was told today it was essential all relevant institutions be included within the remit of the Commission of Inv(...)

Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan: met with members of the Bethany Survivors group

A meeting with Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan seeking inclusion of Protestant-run mother and baby homes in the proposed Commission of Investig(...)

Minister for Children Charlie Flanagan yesterday briefed the Cabinet on the interim report of a cross-departmental review committee. Photograph: Alan Betson / The Irish Times

The commission of investigation into mother-and-baby homes will look at how the system operated from the foundation of the State until the 1980s. (...)

The funeral of Mr Ronan Mac Lochlainn in Ballymun in 1998.

The Government is to consider establishing another commission of investigation into a justice controversy – the shooting dead by gardaí of a dissident(...)

Eddie McEntee, who says he  was abused in foster care in Kildare in the 1940s. He is applying to mother and baby inquiry to have fostered children in  the 1930s and 1940s and up to 1952 to be included in the terms of reference of mother and baby inquiry. Photograph:  Joanne O’Brien

A call has been made for the terms of the forthcoming inquiry into mother and baby homes to be extended to include people who were in foster care over(...)

Pelletstown, on the Navan Road in Dublin. Between 1924 and 1930, a total of 662 children died at the institution, an average of over 94 deaths a year.

The department of local government and public health’s 1930 report on the mother and baby home in Pelletstown in Dublin was upbeat in its assessment: (...)

Pelletstown, on the Navan Road in Dublin: departmental reports acknowledge  a “deplorable loss of life” in 1925 and 1926. Photograph: Adoption Rights Alliance

More than 660 infants and children died in Pelletstown mother and baby home in Dublin during a seven-year period up to the end of March 1930, State(...)

‘The Tuam Home was, according to the Ryan Report, established in 1925 by the local county council. The council, presumably moved by similar benevolent motives, invited in the Bon Secours Sisters to run it.’ Above, the site of a grave for children who died in the Tuam mother and baby home. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

‘Unwed mothers and their infants were an affront to morality. They were spurned and ostracised both by the public relief and charitable institutions.”(...)