An automated external defibrillator (AED) and dummy. A volunteer can be trained in their use to save lives. Photograph: Thinkstock

If one of your loved ones collapsed in front of you because their heart suddenly stopped beating, would you know what to do? Most of us would feel hel(...)

Writing in the journal Open Heart, leading US cardiovascular research scientist Dr James DiNicolantonio said a “compelling argument can be made for the general lack of evidence in support of a low-fat diet”. Advising people to replace saturated fat with carbohydrates or omega 6 polyunsaturated fats was not supported by scientific research, he said. Photograph: Wojciech Pacewicz/EPA

Diets low in saturated fat do not prevent heart disease or improve health and instead public health warnings need to be issued over sugar, a le(...)

Ethics can be hard to hang on to when you’re shopping, and once you start looking closely at your purchases you will find few brands that are (...)

Excluding illness, poverty and smoking, researchers found that an increase of just a fifth in the levels of the smallest pollution particles, caused by engine fumes and coal smoke, cause heart attack numbers to jump by 13 per cent. Photograph: Reuters

Long-term exposure to air pollution has been linked to a sharp increase in heart attacks and angina cases, according to research in five European Unio(...)

Participants at the beginning of Monday’s Airtricity Dublin Marathon.  Photograph: Cyril Byrne/The Irish Times.

A man who collapsed after a suspected heart attack at the end of the Dublin Marathon on Monday has died in hospital. Ricki Savage (27), who was f(...)

Hitting the road could be as effective as popping the pills according to new BMJ research. Photograph: Thinkstock

Exercise may be just as effective as drugs at treating common diseases, according to a large study.The research, on more than 339,000 people, found be(...)

The popularity of Northern Ireland’s so-called “heart attack on a plate”, along with other foods containing saturated fats, is a factor 
in relatively more people in the north sufferinghigh incidence of heart disease
behind the relatively high heart disease rate, said Prof
essor
 Jeremy Pearson of the British Heart Foundation. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

The number of people dying from heart disease in Northern Ireland is double the rate of that in southern parts of England and this in part is d(...)

Bald or extensively balding men aged between 55 and 60 were 44 per cent more likely to develop coronary artery disease, according to the study published in the online journal BMJ Open. Photograph: Bryan O'Brien/The Irish Times

Bald men have a higher risk of developing heart disease than men with a full head of hair — but only those who are thinning on top rather than (...)