Jennifer Johnston’s How Many Miles to Babylon? – Nomad Theatre stage version including  Fergal McElherron and Sam Peter Corry – represented important attempts to re-examine the first World War and its legacy. Photograph: Colm Henry

War is ambivalent; for the powers that decide to wage it, it is as ancient as man, even older than Homer and is caused by expansionist greed and do(...)

John Boyne: “Life is short; I feel no compunction to finish a novel that is boring me. I’ll read something else.” Photograph: Dave Meehan

John Boyne’s latest novel is Stay Where You Are And Then Leave. His new novel for adults – his first set in contemporary Ireland – will be publishe(...)

 Joseph O’Connor:  his story of a rock band’s rise from Thatcher-era London to the Hollywood Bowl has  been shortlisted for the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize. Photograph: Eric Luke

Joseph O’Connor’s story of a rock band’s rise from Thatcher-era London to the Hollywood Bowl and John Niven’s tale of a debauched Irish novelist ha(...)

The stage version of Birdsong. Photograph: Jack Ladenburg

Not long ago, in a grand room studded with military portraits in the National Army Museum in London, a man did his best to account for the firs(...)

 Ben Kane: the author of historical fiction last year walked Hadrian’s Wall to raise money for Combat Stress and Medecins Sans Frontieres  clad in full, authentic Roman dress. Photograph: NorthNewsAndPictures

Ben Kane, described by Wilbur Smith as “the rising star of historical fiction”, has written nine novels. The latest, the fourth in his Hannibal ser(...)

Manil Suri: a scene in his The City of Devi impressed judges.  “We streak like superheroes past suns and solar systems, we dive through shoals of quarks and atomic nuclei,” he wrote. Photograph: Jose Villarrubia

Manil Suri has won the annual Bad Sex in Fiction award for a scene in his novel The City of Devi describing a sexual encounter in terms of exploding s(...)

David Suchet as Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot, who is set to be revived by crime writer Sophie Hannah

When I was about six years old I became intensely jealous of A.A Milne. He had invented Tigger and Roo, so I couldn’t write stories about them myself.(...)