John Banville: ‘For my Banville novels, the question of voice and point of view hardly arises, since they’re all in the first person. The Benjamin Black books are entirely in the third person, which allows for multiple points of view.’ Photograph: David Levenson/Getty Images

If character and plot have their own solid, architectural structures, one of the most intangible elements of a story, for many writers, is tone. Th(...)

Photograph: Aidan Crawley

A Clockwork Orange, Less Than Zero, Trainspotting, Fight Club: delinquent fiction warrants a bookshelf of its own. Rob Doyle’s debut novel, Here Are t(...)

Fan fiction: the band in Joseph O’Connor’s book could only have hit big in the 1980s (like Bauhaus). Photograph: Fin Costello/Redferns

From Don DeLillo’s Great Jones Street to Iain Banks’s Espedair Street, the rock’n’roll novel is a tricky beast. Rock fables tend to favour one of two (...)

Oona Frawley: nascent potential

In the past two years Irish writing has become a crowded, vibrant place. Stalwarts jostle for elbowroom alongside new voices, and these names –(...)

John Shevlin dressed as James Joyce at the launch of Dubliners in April 2012 as Dublin’s One City, One Book choice. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Next month marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of James Joyce’s celebrated short story collection, Dubliners, and a new Irish publisher (...)

The Books That Define Ireland, by Tom Garvin and Bryan Fanning, looks at 30 classic Irish texts, from history and social issues to the fictional w(...)

June Shannon: ‘The biggest improvement on the buses is the real-time information at bus stops, which is pretty accurate.’ Photograph: Aidan Crawley

The bus is at the bottom of the transport hierarchy. It is now languishing well below the bicycle. It was in this lowly position even before the natio(...)

Donal MacIntyre, presenter of Print and Be Damned, the four-part series on the newspaper industry that begins tonight on TV3, describes the program(...)

Telling his story: Peter Murphy with Donal MacIntyre of TV3

Peter Murphy, son of former Bishop of Galway Eamon Casey and Annie Murphy is now 38. He sells consumer electronics in a store near Boston. He was in D(...)

Arthur Pennell and Peter Murphy, at the time of the revelation that Peter was the son of Eamon Casey. Photograph Matt Kavanagh

A frosty reception from Bishop Eamon Casey and his then comparatively affluent circumstances in Galway prompted the 1992 call to The Irish Times which(...)