“The key issue for me was why people [joined the revolution]? How were young working-class men and women, just ordinary people, radicalised?” Playwright Deirdre Kinahan pictured in Dublin Castle. Photograph: Bryan Meade

It has been almost 20 years since playwright Deirdre Kinahan made her theatrical debut. It was 1997, and she had been hovering around the amateur dram(...)

Perfect for the centenary year that’s in it, Red Roof was once the gate lodge to Roebuck House, home to Maud Gonne MacBride and her son Seán. They ha(...)

Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform Brendan Howlin reading Easter 1916 by WB Yeats in Hargadons Bar, Sligo. Photograph: Brian Farrell

Even over Christmas, the regulars at Hargadons pub in O’Connell Street, Sligo refused to let Yeats down. The pub – which in 1864 opened its doors the(...)

The Gore-Booth sisters Constance and Eva posing for a Drumcliffe Creamery advertisement c.1895. Photograph: Sligo County Library.

So is Romantic Ireland dead and gone? As the last embers of Yeats 150th birthday die, it seems as good a time as any to interrogate a poetic cliche. (...)

Aisling Law, a descendant of Maud Gonne, in Rossnaree House, Slane, Co Meath. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Rossnaree House near Slane, Co Meath, is a rambling country pile, with a dog called Rocky and a tabby cat in the porch, and a stop-you-in-your-trac(...)

John Banville, Eavan Boland (pictured above) and John Montague are among the line-up for a Yeats 150th anniversary event at the National Concert Hall next month.

Rebellion at Stinging Fly The deadline for submissions to The Stinging Fly February 2016 issue is this Friday, August 14th. In the Wake of the (...)

Detail from Krasnym Bej Belych, Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge (1919-1920) by El Lissitzky. Courtesy Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven

El Lissitzky: The Artist and the State Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin *****   This exhibition centres on the unlikely pai(...)

Diplomatic documents unearthed in France reveal bones sent by the French were not WB Yeats’s bones

There were doubts about the authenticity of WB Yeats’s bones even before they were transferred from France for reburial in Drumcliffe churchyard in(...)

At the turn of the last century Rathgar was a favoured location for political and literary sets. George (AE) Russell lived at Number 25 Coulson Avenu(...)

Tumult: rebel prisoners in Dublin after the Easter Rising of 1916. Photograph: Photo12/UIG via Getty

In 1886, at the age of 21, Willie Yeats published a two-part essay on the poet Samuel Ferguson, who had recently died. Yeats declared of Ferguson, aut(...)