Brazil’s presidential candidates Dilma Rousseff of the Workers Party (left) and Aécio Neves of the Social Democratic Party after their television debate this week. Photograph: Paulo Whitaker/Reuters

A rite of passage among new correspondents in Brazil is to wonder why, in a country where coalitions are inevitable, the Workers Party and the Soci(...)

Brazilian presidential candidates Dilma Roussef (left) and Marina Silva before their final campaign debate on TV Globo in Rio de Janeiro. Photograph: EPA/Antonio Lacerda

At the heart of tomorrow’s presidential election in Brazil is a remarkable political epic starring three former colleagues now locked in a bitter d(...)

Brazilian presidential candidate Aécio Neves at a campaign rally in Rio de Janeiro. “If I win the elections it is going to be very good for Brazil . . . But if I don’t win, and this could happen, it is going to be very good for me from a personal point of view.” Photograph: Antonio Lacerda/EPA

Towards the end of a recent profile in Piauí­ magazine, Brazilian presidential candidate Aécio Neves told the monthly’s reporter: “If I win the ele(...)

Demonstrators are detained by riot police near the Rio de Janeiro government palace during the “National Day of Strikes, Stoppages and Protests”  on Thursday, July 11th. “It is hard to escape the impression that for all the sound and fury in Brasília, in the long-running stand-off between Brazil’s citizens and their politicians the politicians are holding their ground.” Photograph: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

Although the protests that rocked Brazil last month have ended – for now at least – the country’s politicians are making every effort to show they hav(...)