Jim Crace in Dublin in 2013: Having worked as a journalist, he is interested in facts but does not allow them to impede his fiction, where he allows imagination and invention full liberty. “What’s wrong with making it up? It’s a story. It only has to feel real.” Photographer: Dara Mac Dónaill

Never a man to make a fuss, Jim Crace of the direct gaze does appear to find it difficult not to smile. He is always smiling, or so it seems. Today he(...)

Jim Crace’s win is a victory for the art of fiction. One of the finest overall winners to date and only the fourth  English-language  winner, he is a self-described fabulist,  interested in ideas, not characters or even plot.  Harvest, set in  the late medieval world, tells the story of a rural community faced with  the break-up of common land as it is about to fall into the hands of the few

This year’s International Impac Dublin Literary Award has been won by the revered British writer Jim Crace with his dramatic pastoral Harvest. He is t(...)

British writer Jim Crace has won this year’s IMPAC award for his novel Harvest.

This year’s International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award has been won by the revered British writer Jim Crace with his dramatic pastoral Harvest. He is (...)

Colum McCann: he is the only previous Impac winner on the shortlist, having won in 2011 for ‘Let the Great World Spin’. Photograph: Alan Betson / The Irish Times

A wide-ranging selection of novels including last year’s Man Booker winner are among the 10 contenders for the 2015 International Impac Dublin Literar(...)

Eimear McBride: depicts in her own singular language a young woman’s relationship with her brother, and the long shadow cast by his childhood brain tumour. Photograph: Dave Meehan

Eimear McBride has won the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year Award for her debut novel, A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing. The prize was announced as(...)

Breaking Bad

Acornucopia of cultural riches this year left us reaching for superlatives. Everything from Breaking Bad on television to Daft Punk in music, Gone Gir(...)

Eleanor Catton capitalised on two irresistible elements: humour and the traditional yarn. Photograph: Man Booker

Traditional storytelling, admittedly ably assisted by sufficient shaggy dogs to power a giant sled, has secured the 2013 Man Booker Prize for the y(...)

Colm Tóibín with fellow Booker short-listees. Photograph: Olivia Harris/Reuters

Canadian-born New Zealander, Eleanor Catton has won the Man Booker Prize for 2013 with her second novel, The Luminaries.The entertaining human comed(...)

Latest prices: contenders for this month’s prizes. Montage: Dearbhla Kelly/The Irish Times. Odds from William Hill and Paddy Power on October 3rd. Original photograph: Alan Crowhurst/Getty

A pony on the nose for Colm Tóibín and a monkey on the jolly for the Mercury. The big rise in culture betting may not have arty types cluttering up bo(...)

A lone Irish writer features on one of the more interesting shortlists to have emerged in the often capricious history of the Man Booker Prize for Fic(...)