Painting of Brendan Behan and Lucian Freud is part of Mark McFadden’s debut exhibition in Dublin, ‘Literary Greats’, at the Residence club on St Stephen’s Green

This painting of Brendan Behan and Lucian Freud is by Mark McFadden, an Irish artist from Falcarragh, Co Donegal, now living in Monaco. It’s pa(...)

Never had it easy: it took Eimear McBride nearly a decade to get A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing into print

The mother of the Irish novel, Frances Sheridan, was brought up to be illiterate. Her father didn’t want her to be able to read, and her brothers had (...)

Literary lodgings: No 23 Castlewood Ave, Rathmines

Fancy living in a little slice of literary history? Former homes of literary luminaries don’t often become available to ordinary punters, unless of(...)

 Ireland’s Niall O’Brien, in the team that beat the West Indies.   Liam McBurney/PA Wire.

There’s a theory, or at least there used to be, to explain why certain former British colonies, specifically India and Pakistan, chose cricket as thei(...)

Forget the piles of Valentine’s cards you received this morning. Instead consider showing your love for our capital city with this very postable il(...)

The art project by Cliona Harmey displays the names of the most recent ships to arrive into and leave from Dublin Port

Irish trains are named for rivers, while the planes in the Aer Lingus fleet carry the names of saints. This creates the lovely idea of locomotives (...)

‘The current exhibition in Marsh’s, which runs until the end of August 2015, examines what Joyce read during his visits to the Library in October 1902. Strangely, for somebody usually seen as one of Ireland’s most famous non-believers, he was interested in St Francis of Assisi and the Franciscan tradition.’ Photograph:  Bryan O’Brien

Yesterday marked 133 years to the day since James Joyce was born. Like many people, I have long had mixed views about Joyce. I enjoyed Dubliners ve(...)

The heart of Dublin was so riddled by urban blight 40 years ago that one former Lord Mayor (the late Jim Mitchell, of Fine Gael) complained that it(...)

Brighton Square is one of Dublin 6’s loveliest squares. Triangular rather than square in shape, it is best known as the birthplace of James Joyce on (...)

A first edition of ‘Dubliners’ with the original green dust-jacket went for £86,500 at Sotheby’s in 2013.

Since the new year, first edition copies of Dubliners by James Joyce can officially be classified as “antiques” – or antiquarian as they’re describ(...)