Margaret Atwood. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons
Write on, sister
  • Books
  • July 30, 2014, 18:26

To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee (1960) This classic of modern American literature won the Pulitzer for Harper Lee and has been educating gener(...)

Read hot: summer reading at Bull Wall, Dollymount. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

1 Far from the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity by Andrew Solomon (Vintage, £11.99) We tend to think children will resemble(...)

Jane Casey: “I’d love to write something about London during the second World War. That sense of constant threat, the backdrop of the blackout and broken buildings, the breakdown of social barriers, the now-or-never frantic feel to human relations, the casual heroism – all potent stuff for a novelist”

Born and brought up in Dublin, Jane Casey has been twice shortlisted for the Irish Crime Novel of the Year Award. The Kill, the fifth novel featuri(...)

Holiday ereading: Kindles and other devices are easy to hold on the beach, to pack and to travel with. Photograph: Eyeswideopen/Getty

The sun is out, the cream is on, the laptop is locked and a new book lies waiting. This is the stuff that summer holidays are made of, but the reality(...)

Whether it’s Miami, the Med or, eh, the banks of the Spree, what books should you pack to read your way into the heart of  your destination?

United States Stoner, John Williams (1965) Reissued in 2003 with an introduction from John McGahern, this forgotten classic relates the exp(...)

John Boyne: “Life is short; I feel no compunction to finish a novel that is boring me. I’ll read something else.” Photograph: Dave Meehan

John Boyne’s latest novel is Stay Where You Are And Then Leave. His new novel for adults – his first set in contemporary Ireland – will be publishe(...)

William Hurt (left) as Arkady Renko in ‘Gorky Park’, Michael Apted’s film adaptation from 1983; the Moscow policeman returns in Martin Cruz Smith’s new novel, ‘Tatiana’

‘God knows the truth, but waits,” says one of the characters, quoting Tolstoy, in Martin Cruz Smith’s Tatiana (Simon &am(...)

At the book club recently, something unusual happened. As a group, consensus is not something we usual dabble in. Usually, it’s cockt(...)

The panel of judges for this year’s £30,000 Baileys Prize, and the six shortlisted titles: from left, Denise Mina, Sophie Raworth, Helen Fraser,  Mary Beard and Caitlin Moran

First-time Irish authors Audrey Magee (The Undertaking) and Eimear McBride (A Girl is a Half-formed Thing) have been shortlisted for this year’s Ba(...)

Chris Pavone: Books are for readers, and chances are fairly high that they don’t care about you, even a tiny bit. They want to be entertained or educated or seduced or terrified or blown away by the beauty of a spectacular sentence, and their desires are probably not going to be satisfied with 115,000 words about your teenage angst.
Brought to book: Chris Pavone
  • Books
  • March 20, 2014, 15:36

Chris Pavone follows the success of his first novel, The Expats, a Kindle number one bestseller and a Sunday Times top 10 bestseller, with The Acci(...)