Brazil’s president and Workers’ Party presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff greets her supporters at a rally near Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday. Rousseff is ahead in polls. Photograph: Ricardo Morae/Reuter

Dilma Rousseff is favourite to win a second four-year term as Brazil’s president in tomorrow’s election with opinion poll showing she has carved out a(...)

Brazil’s presidential candidates Dilma Rousseff of the Workers Party (left) and Aécio Neves of the Social Democratic Party after their television debate this week. Photograph: Paulo Whitaker/Reuters

A rite of passage among new correspondents in Brazil is to wonder why, in a country where coalitions are inevitable, the Workers Party and the Soci(...)

 Candidate of the Partido de la Social Democracia Brasilena (PSDB) Aecio Neves during an election campaign rally in Rio de Janeiro. Photograph: EPA/Antonio Lacerda

The increasing prospect of regime change in Brazil is making Petroleo Brasileiro the world’s best major oil stock. It’s also opening the door for fore(...)

Dubious alliances: Brazil’s president and candidate for re-election Dilma Rousseff greets supporters in Teresina, Piaui, on Wednesday. Photograph: Ichiro Guerra/EPA

To understand the Janus-faced politics of Brazil, you could do worse than visit Residencial Ouro Preto, in Maceió, the capital of the northeastern sta(...)

Brazilian Social Democracy Party presidential candidate Aecio Neves: spectacular political resurrection. Photograph: AP Photo/Eugenio Savio

After a contest already full of twists and turns, Brazilian voters delivered a major surprise on Sunday when they dumped Marina Silva out of the count(...)

Brazil’s President and Workers’ Party presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff reacts during a news conference after voting in the first round of election in Brasilia. Ms Rousseff placed first in Sunday’s election but did not get enough votes to avoid a runoff and will face pro-business rival Aecio Neves. Photograph: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters

Brazil’s leftist President Dilma Rousseff placed first in yesterday’s election but did not get enough votes to avoid a runoff and will face pro-busine(...)

Brazilian socialist presidential candidate Marina Silva (top centre)  is mobbed as she arrives at the airport in her hometown of Rio Branco, where she will vote in the general elections today. Photograph: Sergio Moraes/Reuters.

Brazilians vote today in the most unpredictable presidential election in decades and the first since the end of an economic boom underpinning the left(...)

Brazilian presidential candidates Dilma Roussef (left) and Marina Silva before their final campaign debate on TV Globo in Rio de Janeiro. Photograph: EPA/Antonio Lacerda

At the heart of tomorrow’s presidential election in Brazil is a remarkable political epic starring three former colleagues now locked in a bitter d(...)

Jovita Rosa in front of Brazil’s congress building in Brasília: ‘In Brazil it is not the lack of money that explains poor public services but corruption, and corruption flourishes because hidden business interests do not want public services to work.’ Photograph: Tom Hennigan

When Jovita Rosa approaches people while canvassing in Guará, a satellite city of nearby Brasília, most strike an inherently suspicious pose. Even her(...)

Brazilian presidential candidate Aécio Neves at a campaign rally in Rio de Janeiro. “If I win the elections it is going to be very good for Brazil . . . But if I don’t win, and this could happen, it is going to be very good for me from a personal point of view.” Photograph: Antonio Lacerda/EPA

Towards the end of a recent profile in Piauí­ magazine, Brazilian presidential candidate Aécio Neves told the monthly’s reporter: “If I win the ele(...)