Harvard Business School professor Clayton Christensen predicted the iPhone would not succeed. Now, the business guru explains, it was disruptive after all; the market disrupted was for laptops rather than mobile phones. Photograph: Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images

Last week, I described the responses of music and book publishers to digital technology. The evolution of these industries illustrates the “innovator’(...)

 Clayton Christensen: Harvard professor was on the receiving end of a scathing attack

Economics, literary criticism, political science, anthropology – just some of the academic fields that have given us high-profile intellectual dispute(...)

Measuring up: With experimentation at the heart of all research, it is rare that the producer knows exactly how a project will turn out

While the modern world of commercially driven research might lead you to believe that most innovators and inventors know exactly what they’re doing, t(...)

Mind matters: without access to top entrepreneurial talent, struggles with innovation could lead increasing numbers of companies with the capacity to make a huge impact to give up

It was a week before a big innovation conference in Australia in which I was set to debate the negative side of the question: “Would innovation make t(...)

“Disruptive innovation, which entails radical service reconfiguration and deep cultural reform, will require expertise in managing complex change and courageous leadership by all interested groups. It will not all come down to James Reilly.” Photograph: University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust /PA Wire

For the sixth year in a row pre-budget political tensions and pubic dismay at the announced “hits”crystalise a central challenge for Irish society: ho(...)

What can Ernest Hemingway teach us about industrial disruption? The master of terse prose was more concerned with war, pugilism and other overt displa(...)

Steve Ballmer’s  blanket dismissal of the iPhone back in 2007 will go down as one of the most damning moments of his career.  Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg

In 1962, the head of A&R at Decca Records, Dick Rowe, rejected the chance to sign the Beatles, allegedly telling Brian Epstein that the foursome h(...)