Melisandre adds a much needed dose of religious fanaticism to a plot already boiling over with  frothing blood lust.

Game of Thrones has swooped back into our lives on Sky Atlantic and shows no sign of dropping the relentless pace that has made it the most famous ser(...)

 Stephen Rea  and Sean McGinley  take a  bow after performing in Ages of the Moon in New York in 2010. Photograph: Ben Hider/Getty Images

The actor Stephen Rea will receive this year’s Special Tribute award at the Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards. The presentation will be made at (...)

Saskia Reeves and Donal McCann taking a break from the shooting of the film December Bride in Anglesea Street, Dublin in 1989. Photograph: Paddy Whelan/The Irish Times

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the release of Thaddeus O’Sullivan’s poignant film version of Sam Hanna Bell’s powerful novel, December Bride.(...)

The best performance and plays in Irish theatre in 2014 will be celebrated on February 22nd, when The Irish Times gives out its annual Theatre Awar(...)

What were your cultural highlights of 2014? Michael Longley’s beautifully fragile evocation of life, death, nature and memory in The Stairwell.(...)

Charlie Murphy knows the Christmas drill: “Too many tins of Roses. Sweating in your jumper. Watching an old film on TV. Popping over to different p(...)

Uncanny: Sinéad Cusack, Charlie Murphy and Ciarán Hinds in Our Few and Evil Days

There is a line in Mark O’Rowe’s new play, Our Few and Evil Days, at the Abbey Theatre, that is so obedient to the rhythm of reported speech, and n(...)

Our Few and Evil Days: “You listen to the painstaking dialogue, though, like a surveillance team hoping to catch someone in confession”

Our Few and Evil Days Abbey Theatre, Dublin ****It isn’t remarkable that Mark O’Rowe, a master of sensational monologues, should return to dialogue fo(...)

Verbal pyrotechnics: Mark O’Rowe. Photograph: Alan Betson

Mark O’Rowe is best known for the verbal pyrotechnics of his monologue plays, dark narratives full of spectacular imagery and linguistic experiment. I(...)

The Sea

In recent years, John Banville has turned to writing crime fiction of a noirish hue. Somewhat surprisingly, this efficient, elegant adaptation (...)