How Thicke can you get? Reports that someone in Ireland bought a copy by mistake remain unconfirmed

‘When you’re not busy objectifying women, making light of rape and justifying sexual violence, how do you like to relax?” This was a question p(...)

Rob Doyle: “I’m grateful to the authors of shorter books, because my concentration is shot from the internet and all the coffee”

Rob Doyle was born in Dublin, and holds a first-class honours degree in Philosophy and an MPhil in Psychoanalysis from Trinity College Dublin. His (...)

Whether it’s Miami, the Med or, eh, the banks of the Spree, what books should you pack to read your way into the heart of  your destination?

United States Stoner, John Williams (1965) Reissued in 2003 with an introduction from John McGahern, this forgotten classic relates the exp(...)

‘Seamus Heaney suggested that if the American national myth is the frontier, the Irish national myth is the bog.’ Photograph: Matt Kavanagh

Through such writers as Beckett, Shaw and Wilde, Irish literature cannot be accused of ignoring philosophy, but very often it features as the butt (...)

The first day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916. Photograph: The Art Archive / Imperial War Museum
Putting war into words
  • Books
  • April 10, 2014, 09:36

“You can always tell an old soldier by the inside of his holsters and cartridge boxes. The young ones carry pistols and cartridges; the old ones, g(...)

“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.”  Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca (1938). Posted by Camisonup and David Russell

“Call me Ishmael.” Herman Melville, Moby Dick (1851), Posted by Austin Duffy “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was t(...)

 Colin Wilson

For a few months in the 1950s, Colin Wilson, who has died aged 82, was taken at his own valuation as “the major literary genius of our century”. The p(...)

Albert Camus: formidable gifts of analysis and lucidity

The clandestine Resistance newssheet Combat published 58 issues during the German occupation of France, which appeared sporadically as conditions allo(...)

French author and philosopher Albert Camus (1913-1960) on a terrace outside his Paris office in 1957. Photograph: Loomis Dean/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

That Camus became one of the finest writers of the 20th century and a Nobel laureate is something of a miracle. The writer was born 100 years ago, on (...)

Only 73 French people have been interred in the Pantheon in Paris, more than half by Napoleon. “Pantheonisation” is one of the last privileges left to a French president, but like everything else, it has turned into a dilemma for François Hollande. Photograph: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

It was a day devoted to the quest for heroes, in an age that no longer seems to produce them. Three former prime ministers, six of France’s leading hi(...)