Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras has accused bailout monitors of making “absurd” demands. Photograph: Kostas Tsironis/Bloomberg

What is going to happen with Greece? Nobody knows. That does not mean nobody cares. On the contrary people care passionately, in directly conflicting (...)

‘It is possible to have too much finance. More importantly, significant economies are in this position, among them Japan and the US.’ Photograph: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Is it possible to have too much finance? Harmed by the aftermath of financial crises, enraged by bailouts of financial institutions, irritated by t(...)

Yields on government bonds of the big advanced economies peaked in the early 1980s: Japan’s peak was near 10 per cent, Germany’s 11 per cent, and those of the US and UK 15 per cent and 16 per cent.

Is the 3½ decade long bull market in the highest-rated government debt over? If so, would that be a good thing or a bad one? The answer to the first q(...)

Protesters, many against the so-called fast track trade authority of the TTP trade agreement, rally outside a hotel where US President Barack Obama held a meeting in Portland, Oregon last week. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Should proposed US plurilateral trade agreements be welcomed? This is a big question, not least for those who consider the liberalisation of world tra(...)

If the Conservatives win enough seats in the general election to retain power, it will be their reputation for economic competence and Labour’s for th(...)

In what condition does the coalition government leave the UK economy? Photograph: Reuters/Luke Macgregor/Files

In what condition does the coalition government leave the UK economy? Needless to say, its members are fighting the general election on the propositio(...)

Greek myths: A sixth myth is that if Greece defaults, it would have to create a new currency and so leave the eurozone.

The Greek epic continues. It will not end well if the people involved do not recognise they are clinging on to myths. Here are six, each of which pose(...)

A shopper is seen through large lantern decorations at a shopping mall in Beijing. Capital growth is falling after a huge investment boom in the 2000s, particularly in China. Photograph: Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

It seems at first a puzzling scenario, and you might wonder whether it is possible at all: output can be at potential but still not be sustainable.(...)

A street vendor selling Greek shadow-puppet theatre figures  in Athens: Greece remains internationally uncompetitive, as shown by the sluggishness of its exports. Photograph: Kostas Tsironis/Reuters

Since the election of Greece’s Syriza-led government, negotiations over its place in Europe have gone terribly, with posturing on one side and anno(...)

‘In early 2011, the European Central Bank raised its intervention rate from 1 to 1.5 per cent. This was wildly inappropriate, and in the end it had to cut rates again and embark on QE.’ Photograph: Daniel Roland/AFP/Getty Images

Why are interest rates so low? The best answer is that the advanced countries are still in a “managed depression”. This malady is deep. It will not(...)