A Victorian iron ‘Famine Pot’ used as as planter, with orange T. vvedenskyi ‘Henry Hudson’ in Angela Jupe’s Offaly garden. Photograph: Richard Johnston

Using architectural salvage and occasional vintage pieces in the garden in combination with up-cycled or unconventional building materials has alwa(...)

Meet the Tomtato: You say tomato, I say potato . . . but now meet the “tomtato”. Gardeners have taken to this strange plant in a big way. Its ‘(...)

The ‘smarties bed’ in June Blake’s Co Wicklow garden last year, filled with ‘Burgundy’, ‘Ballerina’, ‘Negrita’, ‘Aladdin’ and ‘Bastagne Parrot’ tulips. Photograph: Richard Johnston

There are moments, such as in the middle of an ice-cold, stone-hard winter, when it feels as if time has slowed to a frozen standstill in the garde(...)

Fitzgerald Nursery staff harvesting a crop of sweet potatoes grown under cover in Co Kilkenny. Photograph: Pat Fitzgerald/Fitzgerald Nurseries

In the same way that I have a soft spot for eccentrics and oddballs of the human kind, so I’ve always been intrigued by the horticulturally strange(...)

While I’m not sure why it should be so, I think it would be fair to say that champion vegetable growing has traditionally been a peculiarly male pu(...)

Sculptural foliage of silver leafed Astelia, Schefflera hoi and tree ferns growing in the city garden of designer Bernard Hickie. Photograph: Richard Johnston

Like most people, I don’t have a woodland garden. Which is not to say that I don’t have plenty of shady spots in the garden that are eminently suitabl(...)

Fionnuala’s garden last summer, filled with plants grown from seed under cover earlier that year. Photograph: Richard Johnston

‘And now,” cried Max, “let the wild rumpus start!” It’s at this time of the gardening year that I start to feel like that little boy in Maurice Sen(...)

Omphalodes ‘Starry Eyes’. Photograph: Paddy Tobin

What is your favourite Irish plant? And no, you’re not allowed to say shamrock … Instead, I’m thinking of the thousands of wonderful garden plants (...)

To a non-gardener, the idea of cutting back a growing plant as a way of encouraging it to grow, seems, quite understandably, like an inexplicably odd (...)

Willow weaver Beth Murphy at work in her country garden on County Kildare. Photographs: Richard Johnston

Whimsy ... not only do I love it as a word but I also like it in a garden, where it brings an air of playful, joyful irreverence. For the same reas(...)