A new treatment for MS

Mon, Oct 11, 2010, 01:00

A chara, – Multiple sclerosis has been known as a venous problem since 1863. This, however, had not been proven until recently when an Italian doctor Paolo Zamboni investigated the venous possibilities connected to his wife’s MS. With modern diagnostic equipment like ultrasound and MRV he found that her jugular veins were narrowed restricting blood flow from her brain and causing reflux where the used blood flows backwards into the brain depositing iron which causes MS disability and various symptoms. It is now called CCSVI – chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. Research indicates that about 90 per cent of MS sufferers have CCSVI.

To date around the world about 4,000 MS sufferers have had the simple angioplasty procedure done on their jugular veins and almost all have confirmed improvement in symptoms and have no use for the ultra-expensive medicines normally prescribed for MS sufferers. Some of the results are almost miraculous, with some patients going to get the angioplasty in a wheelchair and being able to walk within weeks. The procedure is called the Liberation Treatment.

Neurologists and MS societies are paid huge amounts of money by the drug companies to prescribe and advertise all the MS medications. They know if the Liberation Treatment gets approval then all this money will stop.

Some neurologists also say that the Liberation Treatment is too dangerous. The facts are that around 2.5 million angioplasties are performed around the world annually for various venous or arterial problems.

As with all procedures there are risks. Of the approximately 4,000 Liberated people around the world, one has died because of an adverse reaction to the blood thinning medication required. So the risk is 1/4,000 and lessening daily. The MS medication Tysabri prescribed by neurologists has a 1/1,000 chance of killing you and they have no problem recommending this once you sign a disclaimer stating the neurologist or drug company is not responsible for your death if it happens. Tysabri costs the State in the region of €35,000 annually per patient. The Liberation Treatment costs around €7,000 to have done in many countries around the world and has now even started in Scotland after their difficult battle to get approval.

In the region of €100,000,000 could be saved by the HSE every year in Ireland alone.

I and some of the MS sufferers of Ireland are hoping to persuade the authorities to approve the Liberation Treatment soon and give us back our minds and bodies.

My time is running out now because I have stopped taking Tysabri and the neurologists have absolutely nothing else to offer me.

It appears that CCSVI may be one of the many causes of so many, so-called neurological diseases. A connection to Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases is also being researched. – Is mise,




Co Wexford.