‘Youth of the nation for Euro-integration,’ they cry

To protesters in Kiev, the EU represents freedoms threatened by ties to Moscow

Anti-government protesters continue to fortify their barricades to block the police from forcing them out of Independence Square in Kiev yesterday. Photograph: Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Anti-government protesters continue to fortify their barricades to block the police from forcing them out of Independence Square in Kiev yesterday. Photograph: Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Sat, Dec 14, 2013, 01:00

As a horde of big men in masks, helmets and black body armour bore down on them in the freezing early hours of Wednesday, protesters in Kiev feared another beating from riot police.

Led by pop stars, priests and politicians on a stage in the middle of Independence Square, the crowd fended off rising fear and biting cold by singing the national anthem and chanting the slogans of their “revolution”.

“Shame! Down with the gang!” they screamed at President Viktor Yanukovich and his government; “Glory to Ukraine! Glory to the heroes!” they shouted, breathing new life into the rallying cry of Ukrainian guerrillas who fought Nazi and Soviet occupiers in the 1940s.

Another slogan, incongruous but equally vehement, is surely unique to this uprising: “The youth of the nation – for Euro-integration!”

These Ukrainians were declaring their commitment to the bruised and battered European Union, or rather to ideals that have become obscured to most of the people who already live there.

“We know it’s not paradise in the EU. And it would be hard for Ukraine, a big and poor country, to integrate in Europe,” says student protester Oleh Bondarenko. “But we are at a crossroads and have to choose. If we go towards Russia things will only get worse. More poverty, more corruption, less freedom. The European way will be hard but it gives hope of a better life. That’s why we are here.”

He was standing on Independence Square – Maidan Nezalezhnosti in Ukrainian – which has been dubbed “EuroMaidan” by participants in what some here are calling their “Euro-revolution”. Smaller EuroMaidans have sprung up in towns and cities across the country, flying the EU banner alongside the blue-and-yellow Ukrainian colours and red-and-black nationalist flags. They took to the streets late last month, when Mr Yanukovich unexpectedly postponed the signing of a political and trade pact with the EU that would tilt Ukraine strongly away from Russia.

Moscow warned it would slash trade with Ukraine if the deal went through, and is offering its neighbour money, cheap energy and a place in a nascent “Eurasian Union” of ex-Soviet states.


‘Civilisational choice’
The rival deals largely relate to trade, but their significance goes much deeper. Twenty-two years after the Soviet empire crumbled, Ukraine must choose whether to return to a Russian-dominated bloc or make a decisive turn to the West. That is why people on all sides are saying this 46million-strong country now faces a “civilisational choice” over its future.

At a conference in Kiev this summer called Orthodox-Slavic Values: The Foundation of Ukraine’s Civilisational Choice, Kremlin leader Vladimir Putin said Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians shared “spiritual values that make us a single people” and a long history that is “the foundation upon which we can build new integration ties”.

We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.

Sponsored

Twitter

News - direct to your inbox

Which Daily Digest would you like?