Minister for Finance Michael Noonan abolished the “Double Irish” loophole in the budget. Photograph: Alan Betson

Government moves to shore up investment after scrapping “Double Irish”

Sky’s Irish subscribers, who previously paid  20 per cent VAT to Britain’s Inland Revenue, will now pay 23 per cent VAT to Ireland’s Revenue Commissioners. Other companies affected by the change include Amazon and internet security firm Norton. Photograph: PA

Boost for exchequer as Irish subscribers to pay tax in Republic, not UK

A trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange this week. As fears from Ebola and a global slowdown spread, stocks plunged. Photograph: Getty Images

Volatility a threat to growth prospects

The tax failed to yield a single cent for the Exchequer in the five years since its introduction.

Levy of 80 per cent applied to gains on sale or development of land the value of which was attributed to planning decisions

Various ways to cut a likely 111% of GDP debt burden will soon be available

Taoiseach Enda Kenny: said there area 410,000 people on low incomes whose earnings are now better off under this Government than the last. Photograph:  Niall Carson/PA Wire

Kenny also promises further round of tax cuts in two years if Government is re-elected

Dundrum Shopping Centre. The budget comes as the Coalition angles for re-election within 18 months. Photograph: Eric Luke Staff Photographer

The net decrease in taxation is €418 million; and the net increase in day-to-day expenditure is €429 million

Michael Noonan and Brendan Howlin during the budget photocall yesterday at Government Buildings. Photograph: Cyril Byrne

Coalition emphasis on ‘the squeezed middle’, says Minister for Finance

This Budget comes as the Coalition angles for re-election within 18 months.

Analysis: Strategy is to spread the largesse as widely among the populace as possible

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