Closure of All Hallows is a loss to third-level education as well as to church

Opinion: A significant number of its students came from families where there was no tradition of higher education

‘All Hallows was once a seminary. It always had a lovely atmosphere, but once vocations declined, it became a warm, humane college of higher education primarily for lay people.’  Photograph: Cyril Byrne / THE IRISH TIMES

‘All Hallows was once a seminary. It always had a lovely atmosphere, but once vocations declined, it became a warm, humane college of higher education primarily for lay people.’ Photograph: Cyril Byrne / THE IRISH TIMES

Sun, Jun 1, 2014, 12:01

Paddy McNamara, now deceased, left formal education at primary level and did his Leaving Cert after retirement. He then studied for a BA, and at 80 became the oldest graduate ever from both All Hallows and DCU.

Paddy’s story is very special, but it is just one of hundreds from All Hallows. The winding down of the college is a huge loss not only for the Catholic Church but for third-level education and north Dublin.

Fr Seamus Ahearne, parish priest of Rivermount in Finglas, sums up much of the feeling in a piece on the Association of Catholic Priests website. “A family member has died. That was the grief here in our parish yesterday. People couldn’t believe it was happening. The phones kept ringing. The sadness was profound. All Hallows was a home; a family; an oasis of hope; a holy place and a symbol of confidence.”

Many members of Fr Seamus’s parish had taken the Pathways course which explored faith, ministry and belief for adults, and for many of them, it was their first positive experience of education.

All Hallows was once a seminary. It always had a lovely atmosphere, but once vocations declined, it became a warm, humane college of higher education primarily for lay people. The Pathways course for adult learners was only one strand.

All Hallows was supervised by the Vincentian order, who emulated Vincent de Paul’s emphasis on social justice. A significant minority of its undergraduate students came from families where there was no tradition of higher education.

Many of them freely admit they would have floundered and even dropped out if they had been in the large institutions that are now being presented as the ideal by academics such as economist Dr Colin Hunt in his report National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030.

The students’ age profile was also unusual, particularly in its many postgraduates, many of whom were mid-career professionals.

For example, there is an innovative MA in professional supervision, taken by among others members of the police force, social workers, counsellors, therapists and parish pastoral workers. (Supervision involves a formal relationship where one’s work is discussed with and evaluated by an experienced professional.)

In many ways, All Hallows was like a dream university – small classes, dedicated staff and a particular focus on people who did not fit the standard student profile, side by side with more mainstream candidates. No wonder it did not survive. It is the antithesis of the current drive for third-level education to serve the market. All Hallows was not going to pull in big research grants for marketable enterprises. It just changed lives.

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