Attorney General examining report on former Tuam home

Katherine Zappone has received expert group’s document on mother-and-baby home

A shrine in the corner  of the site of the former mother-and-baby home in Tuam where the remains of hundreds of children were found.  File photograph: Peter Nicholls/Reuters

A shrine in the corner of the site of the former mother-and-baby home in Tuam where the remains of hundreds of children were found. File photograph: Peter Nicholls/Reuters

 

Minister for Children Katherine Zappone has received a report of the expert technical group examining the site of the former mother-and-baby home at Tuam.

Ms Zappone confirmed the contents are being considered by the Attorney General’s office before being discussed by Cabinet.

The group was established by the Minister after a significant number of human remains were found during archaeological work initiated last year for the Commission of Investigation into Mother-and-Baby Homes.

Forensic archaeologist Niamh McCullagh was appointed to lead the work and bring together a team of international experts in juvenile osteoarchaeology, forensic anthropology, DNA analysis and archaeology to provide the necessary advice.

Ms Zappone said the report examined a number of options to appropriately respond to the discovery of human remains.

All affected persons will be contacted ahead of any decision being made, the Minister stressed.

She added: “My primary concern is to ensure that whatever action is taken respects the memory and dignity of the deceased children who lived their short lives in this institution.”

The group had liaised with An Garda Síochána, the Irish Red Cross and the local coroner’s office to decide the best path forward.

It had advised Ms Zappone in July identifying the human remains would be complicated as the remains may have become intermixed.