Report on transgender issues debated in Dáil

Lyons praises report that gives recognition to people ‘airbrushed out of our society’

Labour TD John Lyons said it was time for Ireland to produce social legislation that other countries looked to rather than to follow others. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

Labour TD John Lyons said it was time for Ireland to produce social legislation that other countries looked to rather than to follow others. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

Fri, May 9, 2014, 19:12

A TD has questioned why Ireland must always to look to other countries for best practice in legislation rather than being a leader and setting the legal precedents for others.

Labour TD John Lyons said he got very frustrated when he heard the phrase “legally we can’t do that’” or “when we compare our progressive legislation with somebody else’s progressive legislation”.

He said maybe it was time for Ireland to produce the legislation that other countries looked to rather than to follow others, “particularly around social legislation”.

He was speaking during a Dáil debate on a report about transgender issues and the heads of or early outline of a Gender Recognition Bill. Members of the Transgender Equality Network Ireland were in the public gallery for the debate.

Describing the report as a rolling working document, Mr Lyons said it had profound changes for the better for people “who are not recognised, who are airbrushed out of our society, who essentially don’t exist in our society at the moment..... through our laws, and who are now being brought out of the shadows”.

But he highlighted areas of legal contention including the requirements for gender change. The Dáil should not accept that somebody who wanted to go through gender transition had to be single and that the law could not be applied to people who were already married, he said. “We need to find a solution to that.”

In an impassioned speech, the Dublin North-West TD said “I get very, very frustrated when I hear people say ‘there are different points of view legally’”. Mr Lyons said he understood that but “I do know what it’s like to be an advocate for minority groups and it’s not good enough sometimes for that to be the answer”.

Mr Lyons said he knew what it was like to be part of a minority group and “it gets really, really tiresome to be pushing and fighting for something when you’re in a minority. I don’t know what it’s like for transgender people but I do know what it’s like to be a minority from a gay and lesbian point of view.

“You’re asking people who don’t know what it’s like to be you, to legislate for you and to bring up the best possible legislation for you to be included in society as a full whole individual citizen. That can be frustrating.”

He said they had to look at ways of “finding ways to make legislation work to bring people who are left out of society into society”.

He added: “Let’s challenge ourselves around the things where we’re told ‘legislatively we can’t do it’”.

Opening the debate, chair of the education committee Joanna Tuffy highlighted some of the committee’s recommendations including that the age at which a person might apply for a gender recognition certificate be reduced from 18 years to 16. She said there “wasn’t absolute consensus in the committee on this issue, but the recommendation represents the view of the majority”.

We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.