Alan Dukes is nobody’s ‘lapdog’ Taoiseach insists

Bank directors not acting in public interest but in political interest, Adams claims

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams TD: said public interest directors appointed during banking crisis had become “lapdogs” and not “watchdogs”. Photographe: Dara Mac Dónaill

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams TD: said public interest directors appointed during banking crisis had become “lapdogs” and not “watchdogs”. Photographe: Dara Mac Dónaill

Wed, Jul 10, 2013, 01:00



Taoiseach Enda Kenny has rejected claims directors appointed to represent the public interest during the banking crisis were instead acting in the political interest to keep the status quo intact.

Sinn Féin leader Gerry Adams made the allegation as he also claimed the public interest directors had become “lapdogs” and not “watchdogs”.

However, in a staunch defence in the Dáil of one of the directors, Mr Kenny said: “Alan Dukes, former distinguished minister, is nobody’s lapdog.”

Mr Dukes, a former Fine Gael leader, was appointed a public interest director to the former Anglo Irish Bank and then became chairman until the bank’s liquidation in February.

Mr Adams said of Mr Dukes: “He says he’s aware of the contents and . . . we’re led to believe he didn’t tell anyone.”

Public interest
Mr Adams said of public interest directors it was “very clear that they’re not acting in the public interest”.

“It’s my strong suspicion that they’re there to act in the political interest and to keep the status quo intact.”

Mr Adams said: “We were told they were appointed to act as watchdogs . . . but clearly they’re lapdogs.”

Mr Kenny said that in his comments about the revelation of audio tapes of conversations between the bank’s senior executives, Mr Dukes clearly indicated all documentation had been given to gardaí.

The former minister also said he was more than willing to go before any inquiry or committee to answer any questions in relation to his role, Mr Kenny added.

Mr Adams said the directors were “exceptionally well paid”, with Mr Dukes receiving €102,000 in 2009, while former Fianna Fáil minister Ray MacSharry received €69,000, “and in 2011 for 60 days work, Dick Spring [former Labour tánaiste] received the mighty sum of €59,000”.

Pensions
Mr Adams said these amounts were on top of their ministerial or TD pensions.

Mr Kenny said the directors, who were appointed a number of years ago, were bound by company law.