Minister for self-defence stayed true to form to the end

Sketch: Alan Shatter managed to issue a resignation letter that was long on self-justification and absent of contrition

Alan Shatter: “The minister who won universal praise from his colleagues for his work is out of a job. The Government will find somebody to fill the shoes they previously insisted were too big for a mere mortal to occupy.” Photograph: Gareth Chaney/Collins

Alan Shatter: “The minister who won universal praise from his colleagues for his work is out of a job. The Government will find somebody to fill the shoes they previously insisted were too big for a mere mortal to occupy.” Photograph: Gareth Chaney/Collins

Thu, May 8, 2014, 01:01

Controversy upon controversy crashed into Alan Shatter but nothing, it seemed, could dislodge the minister for justice from his lofty perch at the Cabinet table.

And the irony is that when he finally resigned, it was over a controversy that hasn’t even hit yet. Even so, with the report that was to be his undoing still under wraps, the outgoing minister for self-defence managed to issue a resignation letter that was long on self-justification and completely absent of contrition. True to form to the end.

In a heroic gesture, he says he decided to go to spare the Government the controversy that most likely will ensue from the Guerin report into the Garda whistleblowers’ allegations. After all, that would only serve to “distract” from their important work and could hamper the Coalition’s election campaign.

Why this controversy, when all the others were noisily ignored by Shatter’s colleagues? Timing is everything. There were no angry voters complaining about the ongoing Garda saga during the other squalls. The difference is that, this time, the Government needed a head for the doorsteps. So be it. Shatter has gone.


Parting shot
But his parting shot makes it clear that he is not happy with the findings of this report and, typically, he leaves behind an argument with the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission and with Sean Guerin, the senior counsel who compiled it.

He indignantly points out that Guerin didn’t even bother to interview him. Where did we hear that last? Ah yes, it was from the Garda whistleblowers. The ones the Garda top brass and Shatter didn’t give a hearing to either.

Shatter, normally willing to spend hours defending himself against all-comers in the Dáil chamber, didn’t stick around to fight his corner once his resignation had been accepted by Enda Kenny.

More than once – too many times – the Taoiseach, his Ministers and backbenchers praised Shatter to the rafters because of the hours he put in taking Opposition questions and appearing before committees. This was their “never mind the quality, feel the width” defence.

When Shatter was accused by frustrated Deputies of not answering questions, their stock response was to point to all the time he spent on his feet. Similarly, they brandished his work ethic: look at how early the man rises in the morning. “It’s not the time you get out of bed that’s important, it’s what you do with that time,” was Clare Daly’s pithy response to that threadbare defence yesterday.

To say Leinster House was in shock at the sudden announcement of Shatter’s unexpected withdrawal from his theatre of war is an understatement.

Right up to the last, in the face of yet another embarrassment over his breach of data protection law, senior members of the Government had been queueing up to back him. On Tuesday night, a spokesman for Kenny said the Taoiseach had confidence in Shatter. (Presumably, this was before he took delivery of the Guerin report, which set in train the chain of events that would lead to Shatter’s shock departure yesterday afternoon.)

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