McGuinness ‘should take PSNI allegations to Ombudsman’

Taoiseach tells the North’s Deputy First Minister to lodge complaint about a ‘cabal’ in police force

Taoiseach Enda Kenny has told Northern Ireland’s Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness that he should complain to the Ombudsman’s office about his allegation of a cabal in the PSNI.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny has told Northern Ireland’s Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness that he should complain to the Ombudsman’s office about his allegation of a cabal in the PSNI.

Tue, May 6, 2014, 08:30

Taoiseach Enda Kenny has told Northern Ireland’s Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness that he should complain to the Ombudsman’s office about his allegation of a cabal in the PSNI.

Mr Kenny said he spoke to Mr McGuinness and told him he should lodge a formal complaint “based on the information given to him about a cabal operating on the dark side in the PSNI”.

This follows Mr McGuinness’s allegations of political policing by the force against Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams and “an embittered rump of the RUC” that wanted to settle old scores whatever the cost.

He was speaking in the wake of the release of Gerry Adams after four days of questioning about the abduction and murder of Jean McConville in 1972.

Mr Kenny said he spoke to British prime minister David Cameron yesterday “who confirmed to me very clearly that there was absolutely no political interference on the British side in this investigation”.

He also said he accepted from Mr McGuinness that Sinn Féin supports the policing process both north and south.

And highlighting the success of the Northern Ireland Ombudsman’s office he said that former Ombudsman Nuala O’Loan had “brought a number of PSNI officers to heel in the past” and Mr McGuinness should lodge a formal complaint.

Speaking to reporters at the Fine Gael byelection selection convention in Mullingar, the Taoiseach also said the issues dealing with the past and the Haass talks still needed quite a bit of attention from those with political responsibility. He said it was a time of “sensitivity and fragility”