Irish Water managing director John Tierney: Why was Irish Water not highlighting this apparent conservation effect last November amid all the controversy over the introduction of water charges? Photograph: Gareth Chaney Collins

Irish Water did not highlight the fall in water usage last October

Bewleys on Grafton Street: Plans for its redevelopment, costing more than €1 million, were lodged with Dublin City Council in recent weeks. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill/The Irish Times

Premises to reopen in six months but will trade on ground floor only with smaller offering

Minister for  Environment Alan Kelly: in October he announced developers would no longer be able to “buy their way out” of social housing obligations, but would be required to provide less social housing, at 10 per cent. Photograph: Aidan Crawley

Schemes get ahead of law stopping developers buying way out of social housing provision

 The council is to demolish all of the more than 300 flats in the complex, most of which are  empty, and to rebuild less housing on the site. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

Dublin City Council to spend €12.5 million on social housing regeneration scheme

An anti-water charge protest in Dublin city centre. Two  councillors will not be asked to repay the costs of “excessive usage ” of council printing facilities to produce anti-water charge leaflets. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw/The Irish Times.

PBP’s Tina MacVeigh and John Lyons printed some 140,000 anti-water charge leaflets

Figures obtained from Dublin City Council’s engineering department, but applying across Dublin region - which takes in one-third of the State’s population - show water usage was at its peak last September, which was to be the last month of free water. File photograph: Getty Images/iStockphoto

When charges were first to apply in October, use fell 20m litres daily in Dublin region

Of 2,697 homes planned for city, 1,722 will be built by council or housing bodies. Photograph: Thinkstock

Social housing building schemes working to take people off city council’s housing list

Plans for a segregated cycle route along the river Liffey in Dublin city  will be available for public consultation from next week. Photograph: Alan Betson / THE IRISH TIMES

Segregated cycleway will run from Heuston rail station to Point Village

The GAA wants to use council-owned land to create a new main entrance to Croke Park (above, background) from Ballybough Road. The land is currently occupied by part of the Croke Villas estate, a 1960s flat complex on Sackville Avenue (above). File photograph: Eric Luke/The Irish Times

Deal on stadium development agreed but requires approval of Minister for the Environment

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