Turkish murder trial delayed after error over mental health examination

Examination meant for Recep Cetin (22) was mistakenly carried out on his father

The trial was adjourned until late August, while the court awaits the results of a mental health examination on Recep Cetin

The trial was adjourned until late August, while the court awaits the results of a mental health examination on Recep Cetin

Tue, Jul 9, 2013, 07:07

The trial of a Turkish waiter accused of murdering two women from Co Down has been further delayed after a mental health examination meant for him was mistakenly carried out on his father.

Recep Cetin (22), who has admitted killing Marion Graham and Cathy Dinsmore (both 53), had claimed he was mentally ill at the last hearing in May.

His lawyers requested he undergo a mental examination and the court agreed.

However, yesterday chief judge Orhan Kiziltas said the tests had been accidentally applied to his father Eyup Cetin (43), who is accused of helping his son to commit the killings.

The trial was adjourned until late August, while the court awaits the results of a mental health examination on Recep Cetin.

The development unfolded at Izmir Bayrakli Fifth High Criminal Court, where onlookers included Raymond McGuinness, the former partner of Marion Graham. Relatives of the defendants also attended this eighth hearing.

Speaking at the trial, Recep Cetin said the testimony of a “secret witness” contradicted the testimony of police officers who investigated the incident.

Elsewhere, Eyup Cetin asked for his immediate release – claiming he was not guilty and had been “imprisoned for 18 months for nothing”.

His lawyer Aydogan Yolyapan said there was no solid evidence against his client and requested the court to investigate the people responsible for making him undergo a mental health examination when one had not been ordered or requested.

Mr Yolyapan also demanded a second investigation of the crime scene, claiming the wrong area had been investigated by police.

However, the court rejected both appeals and mobile phone evidence, which indicated that the “secret witness” had been near the scene at the time was again heard by the court.