Sean Quinn jnr questioned by gardai after allegations about behaviour on train

Businessman gets 'adult caution’ after disturbance on journey from Westport to Dublin

Sean Quinn Junior at the Four Courts, Dublin last year. Photographer: Dara Mac Dónaill / The Irish Times

Sean Quinn Junior at the Four Courts, Dublin last year. Photographer: Dara Mac Dónaill / The Irish Times

Mon, Mar 25, 2013, 21:19

The businessman Sean Quinn Jnr has been questioned by gardai after allegations that he was drinking alcohol and caused a disturbance on a train journey over the weekend.

Mr Quinn was on a train from Westport, Co Mayo, to Dublin on Sunday afternoon when the incident occurred. The Irish Times understands Mr Quinn had been drinking and that there was a complaint about his behaviour.

The driver contacted gardai to alert them to an unruly passenger on board the 3.15pm service from Westport to Heuston. When the train pulled into the station in Tullamore, Co Offaly, gardai arrived and boarded the train.

Mr Quinn was found in the toilets area and was handcuffed by gardai and taken from the train. He was then questioned about the matter in Tullamore but was not charged.

The “adult caution” mechanism is being applied to case. It involves gardai warning a person about their behaviour without an incident leading to a full criminal investigation or even becoming a criminal matter.

After he had been dealt with by gardai, he then made alternative arrangements to travel back to Dublin where he lives with his wife. Sources familiar with the incident said Mr Quinn was later “very apologetic” for his behaviour.

It is believed he contacted gardai on Monday to apologise for what had taken place.

When contacted yesterday Mr Quinn said he had no comment to make on the matter.

Last summer Mr Quinn, the son of bankrupt businessman Sean Quinn Snr, was given a prison term of three months relating to his role in the Quinn family collapsed businesses. He was jailed after he failed to comply with a court order to reverse actions taken that had put foreign assets related to the Quinn group out of the reach of IBRC, previously Anglo Irish Bank.