‘Talented’ diplomat who underwent personality change died in fall, inquest told

Jeremy Craig (73) served in several posts at home and abroad in 25-year career

Jeremy Craig, a shareholder, speaking at a  Paddy Power AGM in Dublin in 2007. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Jeremy Craig, a shareholder, speaking at a Paddy Power AGM in Dublin in 2007. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

 

A diplomat who played a key role for Ireland in the UN and Middle East died of multiple traumatic injuries following a fall. An inquest into the death of Jeremy Craig (73) of Richmond Court, Dartry, Dublin 6 heard that he was a “talented and exceptional person”.

Mr Craig, a grandson of former TD and Irish Professor of Medicine Sir James Craig, was a respected Irish diplomat who served in several posts at home and abroad during the course of his 25-year career in the Department of Foreign Affairs.

He suffered a seizure followed by a fall in which he sustained a head injury in 2015, Dublin Coroner’s Court heard. Alan Craig said his brother Jeremy underwent a “personality change” following this incident. Over the weekend of February 27th and 28th 2016, they watched the General Election coverage together, Alan Craig told the court.

“He was a member of the Irish Diplomatic Corps and was based in Beirut from 1983 to 1986. He was always interested in politics,” Mr Craig said.

On March 7th 2016 Alan Craig was contacted by gardaí. A man out walking his dogs at Dalkey Quarry had discovered the body of Jeremy Craig shortly after 7am that morning.

According to medical reports, Mr Craig had suffered from anxiety and was taking prescribed anti-depressant medications. He was also suffering from seizures. He was pronounced dead at the quarry at 9.10 am on March 7th 2016. He had sustained serious head injuries in a fall from a five meter cliff, according to a post-mortem. The cause of death was multiple traumatic injuries due to a fall from a height.

Returning an open verdict, Coroner Dr Myra Cullinane said: “There are no eye witnesses...and no documented evidence that he planned to harm himself. There is a possibility he may have sustained a seizure. In those circumstances there is doubt and the coroner gives the benefit of that doubt to the deceased.”

“He was a very talented and exceptional person and had a very fulfilling life prior to these issues which were a very great burden to him,” the coroner said.