Best of times and worst of times for ex-tycoon

Sean Quinn told the court he had initially thought Anglo was a “marvellous” company

Seán Quinn giving evidence at the Anglo trial yesterday.  Drawing: Alwyn Gillespie

Seán Quinn giving evidence at the Anglo trial yesterday. Drawing: Alwyn Gillespie

Tue, Feb 11, 2014, 01:00

Seán Quinn rested his arms on the wooden ledge of the witness box and leaned into the microphone. “How times can change,” he intoned ruefully in a thick northern accent.

The businessman was responding to defence counsel Brendan Grehan SC, who had remarked that Forbes once named him among the 200 richest people in the world. “Your companies employed more than 6,000 people,” said Grehan.

“More,” replied Quinn without hesitation.

“You were making half a billion euro in profits as of 2006?”

“Correct.”

“You were the richest man in Ireland?”

“I read that.”

These short, tennis-rally exchanges between Quinn and Grehan were a feature of the day. Back and forth they went, zoning in on Quinn’s fortunes – and his dealings with Anglo Irish Bank – in the years 2006-2008. Wearing a navy suit and a yellow-and-gold tie, Quinn told the court he had initially thought Anglo was a “marvellous” company. There were three planks to Quinn’s investment strategy: manufacturing, blue-chip companies and property. Anglo was a blue-chip. So were Ryanair and Vodafone. He invested in all three.

“Somewhere along the line, you met CFDs,” said Grehan.

“Yes,” replied Quinn.

The businessman couldn’t quite remember how he first came across the idea of investing in these investment products based on share price. He actually thought he was taking a “conservative” approach with the Anglo positions – after all, said Quinn, he was putting up just a 20 per cent deposit and was investing in a “blue-chip” company that was “regulated by the Irish authorities . . . I didn’t see it as speculative at all,” he said.

Quinn’s CFD positions in Anglo rose steadily. At the end of 2006, the figure was in the high single digits. By September, 2007, when he revealed the size of the holding to two Anglo directors at a meeting in the Ardboyne Hotel in Navan, it was 24 per cent.


Seized the opportunity
The “surprise” with which the Anglo directors greeted the news didn’t lead

Quinn to stop adding to his CFD holdings. He could see that the share price was falling, but at the same time profits at Anglo were increasing. “The [share] price was going down so much and the profits were going up so much,” he said. He saw an opportunity.

“You built up your CFD holdings in a pretty secretive way,” Grehan put it to Quinn.

He disagreed. It was partly in the nature of CFDs that the extent of his holdings wasn’t public, the businessman replied, but it was also the company’s way not to go looking for attention. When it would open a new hotel, for example, it wouldn’t hold an official launch.