Value for Money

Greek-style yoghurt

Taste test: which is the greatest Greek yoghurt?

Taste test: which is the greatest Greek yoghurt?

Mon, Aug 4, 2014, 01:00

WEIGHT WATCHERS

€2.69 for 4x100ml, €6.72 per litre

We have reviewed many Weight Watchers products in the past and have rarely been impressed. This is not one of those occasions. This is not the best yoghurt we have tried this week, but it’s not bad. It has a nice lemon kick and is pleasingly light and creamy. At 71 calories, it is at the lower end of the scale, although, with the exception of the Glenisk option, there is not much to separate them. The only reason this is lower in calories than the Müller is because there is less of it.

Verdict: Average

Star rating: **

 

 

MÜLLER LIGHT

€2.99 for 4x120g, €6.22 per kg

There are 90 calories in this pot of thick and creamy yoghurt. Like the Weight Watchers option, it is very lemony, giving it a sharp and acidic quality that takes us by surprise. It is very thick and very creamy, and is not unlike eating chilled lemon curd. If you’re a fan of lemon curd, that will be good news but the texture leaves us a little cold. After eating the tub, we decide this would go better with a sponge cake and not our breakfast.

Verdict: Not to our taste.

Star rating: **

 

 

GLENISK

€0.89 for 125g, €7.12 per kg

This pot is bigger than the competition and comes with extra calories – almost 50 more than the Weight Watchers option – but the 25g extra explains much of that increase and the quality makes it worth any calories on top of that. It is luscious and lovely. The vanilla pods visible in the mix suggest that it has not been as heavily processed as some of its rivals. It has a beautifully creamy texture and comes closest to replicating the real Greek yoghurts we have tired in faraway places. It has a nice sharpness. It is also Irish and organic. It is dearer than the rest, but not excessively so.

Verdict: Gorgeous.

Star rating: *****

 

 

LIBERTÉ

€2.75 for 4x100g, €5.18 per kg

This is the cheapest of the four yoghurts. It is also the thickest and the sweetest. It comes with a thick layer of honey at the base, which needs to be thoroughly mixed if you want to avoid a real sweet-and-sour breakfast. It is okay, but we are not mad about the texture and not bowled over by the quality of the honey gloop in the mix; we would much rather add our own honey. It is too thick and sweet, but some people might like that. Overall, it isn’t bad, and its cheapness has to be worth an extra star.

Verdict: Cheap and sweet.

Star rating: ***

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