Ceremonies held for newest citizens

 

A further seven citizenship ceremonies are to be held in Dublin today as over 2,250 people from 110 countries across five continents this week joining the ranks of Irish passport holders.

Taoiseach Enda Kenny yesterday attended some of the ceremonies at Cathal Brugha Barracks in Rathmines, at which he called on the nation's newest citizens to "enrich our lives with what you have to offer.”

The ceremonies, which were introduced by Minister for Justice Alan Shatter, shortly after his appointment as Minister last June, give proper recognition to the importance of the granting of Irish citizenship.

</p> <p>People who are granted Irish citizenship have to swear an oath of fidelity to the nation.<br/> <br/> Before last June, people who applied successfully for citizenship had to make their declaration before the District Court. Since then, 32 citzenship ceremonies have been held across the country.<br/> <br/> Speaking at the first such ceremony in Dublin, Mr Shatter said Irish citizenship was not granted lightly and it was right that its granting by the State was marked by a “sense of occasion” that underscored its importance.<br/> <br/> <strong>The Oath: What it says</strong><br/> <br/> <br/> Irish oath of fidelity to the nation and loyalty to the State<br/> <br/> I ,...........(name in full)<br/> <br/> of................................................................................................................................... having applied to the Minister<br/> <br/> for Justice and Equality for a certificate of naturalisation, hereby solemnly declare my fidelity to the Irish nation and my loyalty to the State.</p>